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Stomach Content Analysis of Stocky Hawkfish (Cirrhitus pinnulatus) in Laie Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, Daxton Brooks [et al.]

Stomach Content Analysis of Stocky Hawkfish (Cirrhitus pinnulatus) in Laie Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, Daxton Brooks [et al.]

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C4/ Acoustic Ecology of Indo-Pacific

Fishes



227



Acoustic space sharing in the hullabaloo of a

coral reef in Moorea Island, French

Polynesia.

Fr´ed´eric Bertucci



∗ 1,2



, Katy Maratrat 3 , Eric Parmentier 2 , David

Lecchini 4



1



Centre de Recherches Insulaires et Observatoire de l’Environnement (CRIOBE) – Ecole Pratique des

Hautes Etudes – PSL Research University, EPHE-CNRS-UPVD, USR3278 CRIOBE Laboratoire

d’Excellence ”CORAIL” Universit´e de Perpignan 52 Avenue Paul Alduy 66860 Perpignan Cedex

France, France

2

Laboratory of Functional and Evolutionary Morphology – Campus du Sart Tilman - Bˆat. B6c All´ee

de la Chimie, 3 4000 Li`ege 1, Belgium

3

´

´

Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes (EPHE) – Ecole

Pratique des Hautes Etudes

[EPHE] – Les Patios

Saint-Jacques 4-14 rue Ferrus 75014 Paris, France

4

Centre de Recherches Insulaires et Observatoire de l’Environnement (CRIOBE) – PSL Research

University,EPHE-CNRS-UPVD, USR3278 CRIOBE, Laboratoire d’Excellence ”CORAIL”, BP 1013,

Papetoai, 98729 Moorea, French Polynesia



The more vocal species in a community, the more complex the acoustic environment, and

signals produced by marine organisms in order to communicate may interfere. Since acoustic

space is a limited resource to be shared, selection may have favored a partitioning of the available

acoustic windows both at the temporal and spectral levels. This has already been reported in

insects, frogs, birds or mammals but rarely in fishes. Our study aimed to investigate sounds

produced within an ichthyological community in the North Coast of Moorea Island (French

Polynesia). By using passive acoustic monitoring technics, we identified a total of 38 different

types of sounds, some dominating during day-time while others dominated during night-time.

Over 24h, we also observed a succession of optimal sound production periods for each sound

type which suggests a finer level of temporal partitioning of fish vocalizations. Finally, we further showed that acoustic features of co-occurring sound types significantly differed allowing

partitioning at the spectral level too. These results demonstrate the existence of acoustic partitioning and interference avoidance in a coral reef fish community and highlight how acoustic

communication might be optimized in such a biologically rich and dense environment as coral

reefs.







Speaker



228



Assessing ecological implications of boat

noise disturbance on coral reef fish

communities

Emma Weschke ∗ 1 , Harry Harding 2 , Timothy Gordon 1 , Sophie Nedelec

1

, Ricardo Beldade 3 , Suzanne Mills† 3,4 , Andrew Radford‡ 2 , Stephen

Simpson§ 1

1



University of Exeter – Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter,

Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom

2

School of Biological Sciences, Bristol University – School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol,

24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK, United Kingdom

3

Centre de Recherche Insulaire et Observatoire de l’Environnement (CRIOBE) – Univ de Perpignan

´

´

Via Domitia, Ecole

Pratique des Hautes Etudes

[EPHE], CNRS : USR3278 – BP 1013 Papetoai,

Moorea, French Polynesia, France

4

Laboratoire d’Excellence “Corail” – Univ de Perpignan Via Domitia – 58 avenue Paul Alduy, 66860

Perpignan, France



Anthropogenic noise is recognised as a major pollutant in the 21st century, altering natural

marine soundscapes. There is mounting evidence that noise pollution impacts fish physiology

and behaviour, with consequences for fitness. Important survival behaviour including orientation, post-larval settlement, predator–prey interactions and parental care can be impeded during

periods of exposure to anthropogenic noise. However, no study to date has examined how the

effects of anthropogenic noise on individual species translate at the community level. In this

study, we are assessing species richness and abundance of coral reef fish assemblages across gradients of exposure to investigate whether the noise from well-established, busy boating channels

alters local community composition. This research will provide an important advance from what

we already know at the species level to what is needed to assess real-world implications at the

ecosystem level, whilst also considering the potential for adaptation to chronic exposure. This

research will inform our understanding of current risks to coral reef ecosystem health, providing

a stronger basis for marine management and policy.







Speaker

Corresponding author: suzanne.mills@univ-perp.fr



Corresponding author: Andy.Radford@bristol.ac.uk

§

Corresponding author: s.simpson@exeter.ac.uk





229



Bad parenting and cheating: Impacts of

motorboat noise on coral reef fish

Sophie Nedelec ∗ 1 , Andrew Radford 2 , Suzanne Mills 3,4 , Ricardo Beldade

5

, Leanne Pearl 6 , Brendan Nedelec 2 , Mark Mccormick 7 , Mark Meekan

8

, Isabelle Cote 9 , Stephen Simpson 1

1



University of Exeter – Biosciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter,

Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD, United Kingdom

2

University of Bristol – School of Biological Sciences, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol, BS8 1TQ, United

Kingdom

3

Centre de recherches insulaires et observatoire de l’environnement (CRIOBE) – Universit´e de

Perpignan Via Domitia, Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Centre National de la Recherche

Scientifique : USR3278 – BP 1013 Papetoiai 98729 PAPETOAI, France

4

´

Laboratoire dExcellence

CORAIL (LabEX CORAIL) – Institut de Recherche pour le D´eveloppement,

´

´

Universit´e des Antilles et de la Guyane, Ecole

des Hautes Etudes

en Sciences Sociales, Ecole Pratique

des Hautes Etudes, Institut fran¸cais de Recherche pour l’Exploitation de la Mer, Universit´e de la

R´eunion, Universit´e de la Polyn´esie Fran¸caise, Universit´e de Nouvelle Cal´edonie, Institut d’´ecologie et

environnement – Labex Corail58, avenue Paul Alduy66860 Perpignan CEDEXT´el. : 04 30 19 23

32Email : contact@labex-corail.fr, France

5

Centre de Recherche Insulaire et Observatoire de l’Environnement (CRIOBE) – Univ de Perpignan

´

´

Via Domitia, Ecole

Pratique des Hautes Etudes

[EPHE], CNRS : USR3278 – BP 1013 Papetoai,

Moorea, French Polynesia, France

6

Boulder University – USA, United States

7

James Cook University – Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies and

School of Marine and Tropical Biology, Townsville, Queensland 4811, Australia

8

Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS Townsville) – Australian Institute of Marine Science

PMB 3, Townsville MC Townsville 4810, Queensland, Australia, Australia

9

Earth to Ocean Group,Department of Biological Sciences – Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC,

V5A 1S6, Canada



Anthropogenic noise is a pollutant of international concern, with mounting evidence of disturbance and impacts on animal behaviour and physiology. However, empirical studies measuring survival consequences or interactions between species are rare. We used two field experiments

to investigate how motorboat-noise playback affects parental behaviour and offspring survival

in the spiny chromis (Acanthochromis polyacanthus), and interspecific cleaning mutualisms that

are critical for coral reef fish health, abundance and diversity. In the first experiment repeated

observations were made for 12 days at 38 natural nests with broods of young. Exposure to

motorboat-noise playback compared to ambient-sound playback increased defensive acts, and

reduced both feeding and offspring interactions by brood-guarding males. Anthropogenic noise

did not affect the growth of developing offspring, but reduced the likelihood of offspring survival; while offspring survived at all 19 nests exposed to ambient-sound playback, six of the 19

nests exposed to motorboat-noise playback suffered complete brood mortality. In the second experiment, we conducted in situ observations of cleaning interactions between bluestreak cleaner





Speaker



230



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Stomach Content Analysis of Stocky Hawkfish (Cirrhitus pinnulatus) in Laie Bay, Oahu, Hawaii, Daxton Brooks [et al.]

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