Tải bản đầy đủ - 0 (trang)
2: Calculus with Parametric Curves

2: Calculus with Parametric Curves

Tải bản đầy đủ - 0trang

97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/3/10 4:12 PM Page 670



670



CHAPTER 10



PARAMETRIC EQUATIONS AND POLAR COORDINATES



EXAMPLE 1 A curve C is defined by the parametric equations x ෇ t 2, y ෇ t 3 Ϫ 3t.



(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)



Show that C has two tangents at the point (3, 0) and find their equations.

Find the points on C where the tangent is horizontal or vertical.

Determine where the curve is concave upward or downward.

Sketch the curve.



SOLUTION



(a) Notice that y ෇ t 3 Ϫ 3t ෇ t͑t 2 Ϫ 3͒ ෇ 0 when t ෇ 0 or t ෇ Ϯs3 . Therefore the

point ͑3, 0͒ on C arises from two values of the parameter, t ෇ s3 and t ෇ Ϫs3 . This

indicates that C crosses itself at ͑3, 0͒. Since

dy

dy͞dt

3t 2 Ϫ 3

3







dx

dx͞dt

2t

2



ͩ ͪ





1

t



the slope of the tangent when t ෇ Ϯs3 is dy͞dx ෇ Ϯ6͞(2s3 ) ෇ Ϯs3 , so the equations of the tangents at ͑3, 0͒ are

y ෇ s3 ͑x Ϫ 3͒

y



y=œ„

3 (x-3)

t=_1

(1, 2)



(3, 0)

0



(b) C has a horizontal tangent when dy͞dx ෇ 0, that is, when dy͞dt ෇ 0 and dx͞dt 0.

Since dy͞dt ෇ 3t 2 Ϫ 3, this happens when t 2 ෇ 1, that is, t ෇ Ϯ1. The corresponding

points on C are ͑1, Ϫ2͒ and (1, 2). C has a vertical tangent when dx͞dt ෇ 2t ෇ 0, that is,

t ෇ 0. (Note that dy͞dt

0 there.) The corresponding point on C is (0, 0).

(c) To determine concavity we calculate the second derivative:



x

2



d y



dx 2



t=1

(1, _2)



y=_ œ„

3 (x-3)

FIGURE 1



y ෇ Ϫs3 ͑x Ϫ 3͒



and



d

dt



ͩ ͪ ͩ ͪ

dy

dx

dx

dt







3

2





2t



1

t2







3͑t 2 ϩ 1͒

4t 3



Thus the curve is concave upward when t Ͼ 0 and concave downward when t Ͻ 0.

(d) Using the information from parts (b) and (c), we sketch C in Figure 1.



v



EXAMPLE 2



(a) Find the tangent to the cycloid x ෇ r ͑␪ Ϫ sin ␪ ͒, y ෇ r͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒ at the point

where ␪ ෇ ␲͞3. (See Example 7 in Section 10.1.)

(b) At what points is the tangent horizontal? When is it vertical?

SOLUTION



(a) The slope of the tangent line is

dy

dy͞d␪

r sin ␪

sin ␪







dx

dx͞d␪

r͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒

1 Ϫ cos ␪

When ␪ ෇ ␲͞3, we have

x෇r



and



ͩ







Ϫ sin

3

3



ͪ ͩ

෇r





s3

Ϫ

3

2



ͪ



ͩ



y ෇ r 1 Ϫ cos





3



ͪ







r

2



dy

sin͑␲͞3͒

s3͞2





෇ s3

dx

1 Ϫ cos͑␲͞3͒

1 Ϫ 12



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/3/10 4:12 PM Page 671



CALCULUS WITH PARAMETRIC CURVES



SECTION 10.2



671



Therefore the slope of the tangent is s3 and its equation is





ͩ



r

෇ s3

2







r␲

rs3

ϩ

3

2



ͪ



s3 x Ϫ y ෇ r



or



ͩ



ͪ





Ϫ2

s3



The tangent is sketched in Figure 2.

y



(_r,2r)



(r,2r)



(3r,2r)



(5r,2r)







ă= 3

0



FIGURE 2



2r



4r



x



(b) The tangent is horizontal when dy͞dx ෇ 0, which occurs when sin ␪ ෇ 0 and

1 Ϫ cos ␪ 0, that is, ␪ ෇ ͑2n Ϫ 1͒␲, n an integer. The corresponding point on the

cycloid is ͑͑2n Ϫ 1͒␲ r, 2r͒.

When ␪ ෇ 2n␲, both dx͞d␪ and dy͞d␪ are 0. It appears from the graph that there

are vertical tangents at those points. We can verify this by using l’Hospital’s Rule as

follows:

dy

sin ␪

cos ␪

lim ϩ

෇ lim ϩ

෇ lim ϩ

෇ϱ

␪ l2n␲ dx

␪ l2n␲ 1 Ϫ cos ␪

␪ l2n␲

sin ␪

A similar computation shows that dy͞dx l Ϫϱ as ␪ l 2n␲ Ϫ, so indeed there are vertical tangents when ␪ ෇ 2n␲, that is, when x ෇ 2n␲ r.



Areas

We know that the area under a curve y ෇ F͑x͒ from a to b is A ෇ xab F͑x͒ dx, where

F͑x͒ ജ 0. If the curve is traced out once by the parametric equations x ෇ f ͑t͒ and y ෇ t͑t͒,

␣ ഛ t ഛ ␤, then we can calculate an area formula by using the Substitution Rule for

Definite Integrals as follows:

The limits of integration for t are found

as usual with the Substitution Rule. When

x ෇ a, t is either ␣ or ␤. When x ෇ b, t is

the remaining value.



ͫ







b



A ෇ y y dx ෇ y t͑t͒ f Ј͑t͒ dt



v







ͬ



y␤ t͑t͒ f Ј͑t͒ dt



or







a



EXAMPLE 3 Find the area under one arch of the cycloid



x ෇ r͑␪ Ϫ sin ␪ ͒



y ෇ r͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒



(See Figure 3.)



y



␪ ഛ 2␲. Using the Substitution Rule

with y ෇ r͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒ and dx ෇ r͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒ d␪, we have



SOLUTION One arch of the cycloid is given by 0 ഛ

0



2πr



x



FIGURE 3



A෇y



2␲r



y dx ෇ y



0



0



෇ r2 y



2␲



0



The result of Example 3 says that the area

under one arch of the cycloid is three times the

area of the rolling circle that generates the

cycloid (see Example 7 in Section 10.1). Galileo

guessed this result but it was first proved by

the French mathematician Roberval and the

Italian mathematician Torricelli.



2␲



෇ r2 y



2␲



0



r͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒ r͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒ d␪



͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒2 d␪ ෇ r 2 y



2␲



0



[1 Ϫ 2 cos ␪ ϩ



[



1

2



͑1 Ϫ 2 cos ␪ ϩ cos 2␪ ͒ d␪



]



͑1 ϩ cos 2␪ ͒ d␪

2␲

0



]



෇ r 2 32 ␪ Ϫ 2 sin ␪ ϩ 14 sin 2␪

෇ r 2( 32 ؒ 2␲) ෇ 3␲ r 2



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/3/10 4:12 PM Page 672



672



CHAPTER 10



PARAMETRIC EQUATIONS AND POLAR COORDINATES



Arc Length

We already know how to find the length L of a curve C given in the form y ෇ F͑x͒,

a ഛ x ഛ b. Formula 8.1.3 says that if FЈ is continuous, then



yͱ ͩ ͪ

b



L෇



2



2



dy

dx







a



dx



Suppose that C can also be described by the parametric equations x ෇ f ͑t͒ and y ෇ t͑t͒,

␣ ഛ t ഛ ␤, where dx͞dt ෇ f Ј͑t͒ Ͼ 0. This means that C is traversed once, from left to

right, as t increases from ␣ to ␤ and f ͑␣͒ ෇ a, f ͑␤͒ ෇ b. Putting Formula 1 into Formula

2 and using the Substitution Rule, we obtain

L෇



yͱ ͩ ͪ

b







a



dy

dx



2



dx ෇



yͱ ͩ ͪ





dy͞dt

dx͞dt











2



dx

dt

dt



Since dx͞dt Ͼ 0, we have

L෇



3

y



C

Pi _ 1



P™



Pi



Pn



0



y ͱͩ ͪ ͩ ͪ









2



dx

dt



dy

dt



ϩ



2



dt



Even if C can’t be expressed in the form y ෇ F͑x͒, Formula 3 is still valid but we obtain

it by polygonal approximations. We divide the parameter interval ͓␣, ␤͔ into n subintervals

of equal width ⌬t. If t0 , t1 , t2 , . . . , tn are the endpoints of these subintervals, then xi ෇ f ͑ti ͒

and yi ෇ t͑ti ͒ are the coordinates of points Pi ͑xi , yi ͒ that lie on C and the polygon with vertices P0 , P1 , . . . , Pn approximates C. (See Figure 4.)

As in Section 8.1, we define the length L of C to be the limit of the lengths of these

approximating polygons as n l ϱ :

n



x



L ෇ lim



͚ ԽP



iϪ1



nl ϱ i෇1



Pi



Խ



FIGURE 4



The Mean Value Theorem, when applied to f on the interval ͓tiϪ1, ti ͔, gives a number ti* in

͑tiϪ1, ti ͒ such that

f ͑ti ͒ Ϫ f ͑tiϪ1 ͒ ෇ f Ј͑ti*͒͑ti Ϫ tiϪ1 ͒

If we let ⌬xi ෇ xi Ϫ xiϪ1 and ⌬yi ෇ yi Ϫ yiϪ1 , this equation becomes

⌬x i ෇ f Ј͑ti*͒ ⌬t

Similarly, when applied to t, the Mean Value Theorem gives a number ti** in ͑tiϪ1, ti ͒ such

that

⌬yi ෇ tЈ͑ti**͒ ⌬t

Therefore



ԽP



iϪ1



Խ



Pi ෇ s͑⌬x i ͒2 ϩ ͑⌬yi ͒2 ෇ s͓ f Ј͑ti*͒⌬t͔ 2 ϩ ͓tЈ͑ti**͒ ⌬t͔ 2

෇ s͓ f Ј͑ti*͔͒ 2 ϩ ͓tЈ͑ti**͔͒ 2 ⌬t



and so

n



4



L ෇ lim



͚ s͓ f Ј͑t*͔͒



n l ϱ i෇1



i



2



ϩ ͓tЈ͑ti**͔͒ 2 ⌬t



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/26/10 1:34 PM Page 673



CALCULUS WITH PARAMETRIC CURVES



SECTION 10.2



673



The sum in 4 resembles a Riemann sum for the function s͓ f Ј͑t͔͒ 2 ϩ ͓tЈ͑t͔͒ 2 but it is not

exactly a Riemann sum because ti* ti** in general. Nevertheless, if f Ј and tЈ are continuous, it can be shown that the limit in 4 is the same as if ti* and ti** were equal, namely,





L ෇ y s͓ f Ј͑t͔͒ 2 ϩ ͓ tЈ͑t͔͒ 2 dt





Thus, using Leibniz notation, we have the following result, which has the same form as Formula 3.

5 Theorem If a curve C is described by the parametric equations x ෇ f ͑t͒,

y ෇ t͑t͒, ␣ ഛ t ഛ ␤, where f Ј and tЈ are continuous on ͓␣, ␤͔ and C is traversed

exactly once as t increases from ␣ to ␤, then the length of C is



L෇



y ͱͩ ͪ ͩ ͪ





2



dx

dt







ϩ



dy

dt



2



dt



Notice that the formula in Theorem 5 is consistent with the general formulas L ෇ x ds

and ͑ds͒ 2 ෇ ͑dx͒ 2 ϩ ͑dy͒ 2 of Section 8.1.

EXAMPLE 4 If we use the representation of the unit circle given in Example 2 in Sec-



tion 10.1,

x ෇ cos t



y ෇ sin t



0 ഛ t ഛ 2␲



then dx͞dt ෇ Ϫsin t and dy͞dt ෇ cos t, so Theorem 5 gives

L෇



y



2␲



0



ͱͩ ͪ ͩ ͪ

dx

dt



2



dy

dt



ϩ



2



2␲



2␲



dt ෇ y ssin 2 t ϩ cos 2 t dt ෇ y dt ෇ 2␲

0



0



as expected. If, on the other hand, we use the representation given in Example 3 in Section 10.1,

x ෇ sin 2t

y ෇ cos 2t

0 ഛ t ഛ 2␲

then dx͞dt ෇ 2 cos 2t, dy͞dt ෇ Ϫ2 sin 2t, and the integral in Theorem 5 gives



y



2␲



0



ͱͩ ͪ ͩ ͪ

dx

dt



2



ϩ



dy

dt



2



dt ෇ y



2␲



0



s4 cos 2 2t ϩ 4 sin 2 2t dt ෇ y



2␲



0



2 dt ෇ 4␲



| Notice that the integral gives twice the arc length of the circle because as t increases



from 0 to 2␲, the point ͑sin 2t, cos 2t͒ traverses the circle twice. In general, when finding the length of a curve C from a parametric representation, we have to be careful to

ensure that C is traversed only once as t increases from ␣ to ␤.



v EXAMPLE 5 Find the length of one arch of the cycloid x ෇ r͑␪ Ϫ sin ␪ ͒,

y ෇ r͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒.

SOLUTION From Example 3 we see that one arch is described by the parameter interval

0 ഛ ␪ ഛ 2␲. Since



dx

෇ r͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒

d␪



and



dy

෇ r sin ␪

d␪



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/3/10 4:12 PM Page 674



674



CHAPTER 10



PARAMETRIC EQUATIONS AND POLAR COORDINATES



we have

L෇



y



ͱͩ ͪ ͩ ͪ



2␲



0







The result of Example 5 says that the length of

one arch of a cycloid is eight times the radius of

the generating circle (see Figure 5). This was first

proved in 1658 by Sir Christopher Wren, who

later became the architect of St. Paul’s Cathedral

in London.

y



L=8r



2␲



0



෇y



2␲



෇ry



dy

d␪



ϩ



2



d␪



sr 2͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒2 ϩ r 2 sin 2␪ d␪

sr 2͑1 Ϫ 2 cos ␪ ϩ cos 2␪ ϩ sin 2␪ ͒ d␪



0



2␲



0



s2͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒ d␪



To evaluate this integral we use the identity sin 2x ෇ 12 ͑1 Ϫ cos 2x͒ with ␪ ෇ 2x, which

gives 1 Ϫ cos ␪ ෇ 2 sin 2͑␪͞2͒. Since 0 ഛ ␪ ഛ 2␲, we have 0 ഛ ␪͞2 ഛ ␲ and so

sin͑␪͞2͒ ജ 0. Therefore



Խ



Խ



s2͑1 Ϫ cos ␪ ͒ ෇ s4 sin 2 ͑␪͞2͒ ෇ 2 sin͑␪͞2͒ ෇ 2 sin͑␪͞2͒



r

0



y



2



dx

d␪



2πr



x



L ෇ 2r y



and so



2␲



0



]



sin͑␪͞2͒ d␪ ෇ 2r͓Ϫ2 cos͑␪͞2͒



2␲

0



෇ 2r͓2 ϩ 2͔ ෇ 8r



FIGURE 5



Surface Area

In the same way as for arc length, we can adapt Formula 8.2.5 to obtain a formula for

surface area. If the curve given by the parametric equations x ෇ f ͑t͒, y ෇ t͑t͒, ␣ ഛ t ഛ ␤,

is rotated about the x-axis, where f Ј, tЈ are continuous and t͑t͒ ജ 0, then the area of the

resulting surface is given by





ͱͩ ͪ ͩ ͪ

dx

dt



S ෇ y 2␲ y



6







2



ϩ



2



dy

dt



dt



The general symbolic formulas S ෇ x 2␲ y ds and S ෇ x 2␲ x ds (Formulas 8.2.7 and 8.2.8)

are still valid, but for parametric curves we use

ds ෇



ͱͩ ͪ ͩ ͪ

dx

dt



2



dy

dt



ϩ



2



dt



EXAMPLE 6 Show that the surface area of a sphere of radius r is 4␲ r 2.

SOLUTION The sphere is obtained by rotating the semicircle



x ෇ r cos t



0ഛtഛ␲



y ෇ r sin t



about the x-axis. Therefore, from Formula 6, we get





S ෇ y 2␲ r sin t s͑Ϫr sin t͒2 ϩ ͑r cos t͒2 dt

0











0



0



෇ 2␲ y r sin t sr 2͑sin 2 t ϩ cos 2 t͒ dt ෇ 2␲ y r sin t ؒ r dt









]



෇ 2␲r 2 y sin t dt ෇ 2␲r 2͑Ϫcos t͒ 0 ෇ 4␲ r 2

0



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/3/10 4:12 PM Page 675



SECTION 10.2



10.2



CALCULUS WITH PARAMETRIC CURVES



675



Exercises



1–2 Find dy͞dx.

1. x ෇ t sin t,



; 23–24 Graph the curve in a viewing rectangle that displays all

y ෇ t2 ϩ t



2. x ෇ 1͞t,



y ෇ st e Ϫt



3–6 Find an equation of the tangent to the curve at the point



corresponding to the given value of the parameter.

3. x ෇ 1 ϩ 4t Ϫ t 2,

4. x ෇ t Ϫ t Ϫ1,



y ෇ 2 Ϫ t 3; t ෇ 1



y ෇ t sin t ; t ෇ ␲



6. x ෇ sin ␪,



y ෇ cos ␪ ; ␪ ෇ ␲͞6



3



8. x ෇ 1 ϩ st ,



͑1, 3͒



y ෇ e ; ͑2, e͒



point. Then graph the curve and the tangent(s).

y ෇ t2 ϩ t;



10. x ෇ cos t ϩ cos 2t,



͑0, 0͒



y ෇ sin t ϩ sin 2t ;



͑Ϫ1, 1͒



11–16 Find dy͞dx and d 2 y͞dx 2. For which values of t is the



curve concave upward?

11. x ෇ t 2 ϩ 1,

13. x ෇ e t,



y ෇ t2 ϩ t



y ෇ te Ϫt



15. x ෇ 2 sin t,



y ෇ 3 cos t,



16. x ෇ cos 2t ,



y ෇ cos t ,



27. (a) Find the slope of the tangent line to the trochoid



x ෇ r ␪ Ϫ d sin ␪, y ෇ r Ϫ d cos ␪ in terms of ␪. (See

Exercise 40 in Section 10.1.)

(b) Show that if d Ͻ r, then the trochoid does not have a

vertical tangent.

28. (a) Find the slope of the tangent to the astroid x ෇ a cos 3␪,



; 9–10 Find an equation of the tangent(s) to the curve at the given

9. x ෇ 6 sin t,



y ෇ 2t 2 Ϫ t



discover where it crosses itself. Then find equations of both

tangents at that point.



point by two methods: (a) without eliminating the parameter and

(b) by first eliminating the parameter.

t2



24. x ෇ t 4 ϩ 4t 3 Ϫ 8t 2,



; 26. Graph the curve x ෇ cos t ϩ 2 cos 2t, y ෇ sin t ϩ 2 sin 2t to



7–8 Find an equation of the tangent to the curve at the given



y ෇ t 2 ϩ 2;



y ෇ t3 Ϫ t



tangents at ͑0, 0͒ and find their equations. Sketch the curve.



3



7. x ෇ 1 ϩ ln t,



23. x ෇ t 4 Ϫ 2t 3 Ϫ 2t 2,



25. Show that the curve x ෇ cos t, y ෇ sin t cos t has two



y ෇ 1 ϩ t 2; t ෇ 1



5. x ෇ t cos t,



the important aspects of the curve.



12. x ෇ t 3 ϩ 1,



y ෇ t2 Ϫ t



14. x ෇ t 2 ϩ 1,



y ෇ et Ϫ 1



0 Ͻ t Ͻ 2␲



y ෇ a sin 3␪ in terms of ␪. (Astroids are explored in the

Laboratory Project on page 668.)

(b) At what points is the tangent horizontal or vertical?

(c) At what points does the tangent have slope 1 or Ϫ1?



29. At what points on the curve x ෇ 2t 3, y ෇ 1 ϩ 4t Ϫ t 2 does



the tangent line have slope 1?

30. Find equations of the tangents to the curve x ෇ 3t 2 ϩ 1,



y ෇ 2t 3 ϩ 1 that pass through the point ͑4, 3͒.



31. Use the parametric equations of an ellipse, x ෇ a cos ␪,



y ෇ b sin ␪, 0 ഛ ␪ ഛ 2␲, to find the area that it encloses.



32. Find the area enclosed by the curve x ෇ t 2 Ϫ 2t, y ෇ st and



the y-axis.



0ϽtϽ␲



33. Find the area enclosed by the x-axis and the curve



x ෇ 1 ϩ e t, y ෇ t Ϫ t 2.

17–20 Find the points on the curve where the tangent is horizon-



tal or vertical. If you have a graphing device, graph the curve to

check your work.

17. x ෇ t 3 Ϫ 3t,



y ෇ t2 Ϫ 3



18. x ෇ t 3 Ϫ 3t,



y ෇ t 3 Ϫ 3t 2



19. x ෇ cos ␪,

20. x ෇ e sin ␪,



34. Find the area of the region enclosed by the astroid



x ෇ a cos 3␪, y ෇ a sin 3␪. (Astroids are explored in the Laboratory Project on page 668.)

y

a



y ෇ cos 3␪

y ෇ e cos ␪

_a



0



a



x



; 21. Use a graph to estimate the coordinates of the rightmost point

on the curve x ෇ t Ϫ t 6, y ෇ e t. Then use calculus to find the

exact coordinates.



_a



; 22. Use a graph to estimate the coordinates of the lowest point

and the leftmost point on the curve x ෇ t 4 Ϫ 2t, y ෇ t ϩ t 4.

Then find the exact coordinates.



;



Graphing calculator or computer required



35. Find the area under one arch of the trochoid of Exercise 40 in



Section 10.1 for the case d Ͻ r.



CAS Computer algebra system required



1. Homework Hints available at stewartcalculus.com



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/3/10 4:12 PM Page 676



676



PARAMETRIC EQUATIONS AND POLAR COORDINATES



CHAPTER 10



36. Let ᏾ be the region enclosed by the loop of the curve in



Example 1.

(a) Find the area of ᏾.

(b) If ᏾ is rotated about the x-axis, find the volume of the

resulting solid.

(c) Find the centroid of ᏾.



where e is the eccentricity of the ellipse (e ෇ c͞a, where

c ෇ sa 2 Ϫ b 2 ) .

54. Find the total length of the astroid x ෇ a cos 3␪, y ෇ a sin 3␪,



where a Ͼ 0.



CAS



55. (a) Graph the epitrochoid with equations



x ෇ 11 cos t Ϫ 4 cos͑11t͞2͒



37– 40 Set up an integral that represents the length of the curve.

Then use your calculator to find the length correct to four

decimal places.

37. x ෇ t ϩ e Ϫt,



y ෇ 11 sin t Ϫ 4 sin͑11t͞2͒

What parameter interval gives the complete curve?

(b) Use your CAS to find the approximate length of this

curve.



y ෇ t Ϫ e Ϫt, 0 ഛ t ഛ 2



38. x ෇ t 2 Ϫ t,



y ෇ t 4,



39. x ෇ t Ϫ 2 sin t,

40. x ෇ t ϩ st ,



1ഛtഛ4



y ෇ 1 Ϫ 2 cos t,



0 ഛ t ഛ 4␲



CAS



56. A curve called Cornu’s spiral is defined by the parametric



equations



y ෇ t Ϫ st , 0 ഛ t ഛ 1



t



x ෇ C͑t͒ ෇ y cos͑␲ u 2͞2͒ du

0



41– 44 Find the exact length of the curve.

41. x ෇ 1 ϩ 3t 2,



y ෇ 4 ϩ 2t 3,



42. x ෇ e t ϩ eϪt,



y ෇ 5 Ϫ 2t, 0 ഛ t ഛ 3



43. x ෇ t sin t,



t



y ෇ S͑t͒ ෇ y sin͑␲ u 2͞2͒ du



0ഛtഛ1



0



y ෇ t cos t, 0 ഛ t ഛ 1



44. x ෇ 3 cos t Ϫ cos 3t,



y ෇ 3 sin t Ϫ sin 3t,



0ഛtഛ␲



where C and S are the Fresnel functions that were introduced

in Chapter 4.

(a) Graph this curve. What happens as t l ϱ and as

t l Ϫϱ?

(b) Find the length of Cornu’s spiral from the origin to the

point with parameter value t.



; 45– 46 Graph the curve and find its length.

45. x ෇ e t cos t,



y ෇ e t sin t,



46. x ෇ cos t ϩ ln(tan 2 t),



0ഛtഛ␲



y ෇ sin t,



1



␲͞4 ഛ t ഛ 3␲͞4



; 47. Graph the curve x ෇ sin t ϩ sin 1.5t, y ෇ cos t and find its

length correct to four decimal places.

48. Find the length of the loop of the curve x ෇ 3t Ϫ t 3,



y ෇ 3t 2.



57–60 Set up an integral that represents the area of the surface

obtained by rotating the given curve about the x-axis. Then use

your calculator to find the surface area correct to four decimal

places.



58. x ෇ sin t,



0 ഛ t ഛ ␲͞2



y ෇ sin 2t,



59. x ෇ 1 ϩ te ,



y ෇ ͑t ϩ 1͒e t,



60. x ෇ t Ϫ t ,



y෇tϩt ,



t



2



49. Use Simpson’s Rule with n ෇ 6 to estimate the length of the



y ෇ t cos t, 0 ഛ t ഛ ␲͞2



57. x ෇ t sin t,



3



0ഛtഛ1



2



0ഛtഛ1



4



curve x ෇ t Ϫ e t, y ෇ t ϩ e t, Ϫ6 ഛ t ഛ 6.



50. In Exercise 43 in Section 10.1 you were asked to derive the



parametric equations x ෇ 2a cot ␪, y ෇ 2a sin 2␪ for the

curve called the witch of Maria Agnesi. Use Simpson’s Rule

with n ෇ 4 to estimate the length of the arc of this curve

given by ␲͞4 ഛ ␪ ഛ ␲͞2.

51–52 Find the distance traveled by a particle with position ͑x, y͒



as t varies in the given time interval. Compare with the length of

the curve.

51. x ෇ sin 2 t,



y ෇ cos 2 t, 0 ഛ t ഛ 3␲



52. x ෇ cos 2t,



y ෇ cos t,



0 ഛ t ഛ 4␲



53. Show that the total length of the ellipse x ෇ a sin ␪,



y ෇ b cos ␪, a Ͼ b Ͼ 0, is

L ෇ 4a y



␲͞2



0



s1 Ϫ e 2 sin 2␪ d␪



61–63 Find the exact area of the surface obtained by rotating the



given curve about the x-axis.

61. x ෇ t 3,



y ෇ t 2,



0ഛtഛ1



62. x ෇ 3t Ϫ t 3,



y ෇ 3t 2,



0ഛtഛ1



63. x ෇ a cos 3␪,



y ෇ a sin 3␪,



0 ഛ ␪ ഛ ␲͞2



; 64. Graph the curve

x ෇ 2 cos ␪ Ϫ cos 2␪



y ෇ 2 sin ␪ Ϫ sin 2␪



If this curve is rotated about the x-axis, find the area of the

resulting surface. (Use your graph to help find the correct

parameter interval.)

65–66 Find the surface area generated by rotating the given curve

about the y-axis.

65. x ෇ 3t 2,



y ෇ 2t 3, 0 ഛ t ഛ 5



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/3/10 4:12 PM Page 677



LABORATORY PROJECT



66. x ෇ e t Ϫ t,



y ෇ 4e t͞2, 0 ഛ t ഛ 1



0 for a ഛ t ഛ b, show that the

parametric curve x ෇ f ͑t͒, y ෇ t͑t͒, a ഛ t ഛ b, can be put in

the form y ෇ F͑x͒. [Hint: Show that f Ϫ1 exists.]



68. Use Formula 2 to derive Formula 7 from Formula 8.2.5 for the



71. Use the formula in Exercise 69(a) to find the curvature of the



cycloid x ෇ ␪ Ϫ sin ␪, y ෇ 1 Ϫ cos ␪ at the top of one of its

arches.

is ␬ ෇ 0.

(b) Show that the curvature at each point of a circle of

radius r is ␬ ෇ 1͞r.



69. The curvature at a point P of a curve is defined as



Ϳ Ϳ

d␾

ds



73. A string is wound around a circle and then unwound while



where ␾ is the angle of inclination of the tangent line at P,

as shown in the figure. Thus the curvature is the absolute value

of the rate of change of ␾ with respect to arc length. It can be

regarded as a measure of the rate of change of direction of the

curve at P and will be studied in greater detail in Chapter 13.

(a) For a parametric curve x ෇ x͑t͒, y ෇ y͑t͒, derive the

formula

x᝽y᝽᝽ Ϫ ᝽x᝽y᝽

␬෇ 2

͓x᝽ ϩ y᝽ 2 ͔ 3͞2



being held taut. The curve traced by the point P at the end of

the string is called the involute of the circle. If the circle has

radius r and center O and the initial position of P is ͑r, 0͒, and

if the parameter ␪ is chosen as in the figure, show that

parametric equations of the involute are

x ෇ r ͑cos ␪ ϩ ␪ sin ␪ ͒



Խ



y ෇ r ͑sin ␪ Ϫ ␪ cos ␪ ͒



y



T



Խ



where the dots indicate derivatives with respect to t, so

x᝽ ෇ dx͞dt. [Hint: Use ␾ ෇ tanϪ1͑dy͞dx͒ and Formula 2 to

find d␾͞dt. Then use the Chain Rule to find d␾͞ds.]

(b) By regarding a curve y ෇ f ͑x͒ as the parametric curve

x ෇ x, y ෇ f ͑x͒, with parameter x, show that the formula

in part (a) becomes

d 2 y͞dx 2

␬෇

͓1 ϩ ͑dy͞dx͒2 ͔ 3͞2



Խ



the parabola y ෇ x 2 at the point ͑1, 1͒.

(b) At what point does this parabola have maximum curvature?



72. (a) Show that the curvature at each point of a straight line



case in which the curve can be represented in the form

y ෇ F͑x͒, a ഛ x ഛ b.



Խ



677



70. (a) Use the formula in Exercise 69(b) to find the curvature of



67. If f Ј is continuous and f Ј͑t͒



␬෇



BÉZIER CURVES



r

ă



O



P

x



74. A cow is tied to a silo with radius r by a rope just long enough



to reach the opposite side of the silo. Find the area available for

grazing by the cow.



y



P

˙

0



x



L A B O R AT O R Y P R O J E C T ; BÉZIER CURVES

Bézier curves are used in computer-aided design and are named after the French mathematician Pierre Bézier (1910–1999), who worked in the automotive industry. A cubic Bézier curve

is determined by four control points, P0͑x 0 , y0 ͒, P1͑x 1, y1 ͒, P2͑x 2 , y 2 ͒, and P3͑x 3 , y 3 ͒, and is

defined by the parametric equations

x ෇ x0 ͑1 Ϫ t͒3 ϩ 3x1 t͑1 Ϫ t͒2 ϩ 3x 2 t 2͑1 Ϫ t͒ ϩ x 3 t 3

y ෇ y0 ͑1 Ϫ t͒3 ϩ 3y1 t͑1 Ϫ t͒2 ϩ 3y 2 t 2͑1 Ϫ t͒ ϩ y 3 t 3



;



Graphing calculator or computer required



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/3/10 4:12 PM Page 678



678



PARAMETRIC EQUATIONS AND POLAR COORDINATES



CHAPTER 10



where 0 ഛ t ഛ 1. Notice that when t ෇ 0 we have ͑x, y͒ ෇ ͑x 0 , y0 ͒ and when t ෇ 1 we have

͑x, y͒ ෇ ͑x 3 , y 3͒, so the curve starts at P0 and ends at P3.

1. Graph the Bézier curve with control points P0͑4, 1͒, P1͑28, 48͒, P2͑50, 42͒, and P3͑40, 5͒.



Then, on the same screen, graph the line segments P0 P1, P1 P2, and P2 P3. (Exercise 31 in

Section 10.1 shows how to do this.) Notice that the middle control points P1 and P2 don’t lie

on the curve; the curve starts at P0, heads toward P1 and P2 without reaching them, and ends

at P3.

2. From the graph in Problem 1, it appears that the tangent at P0 passes through P1 and the



tangent at P3 passes through P2. Prove it.

3. Try to produce a Bézier curve with a loop by changing the second control point in



Problem 1.

4. Some laser printers use Bézier curves to represent letters and other symbols. Experiment



with control points until you find a Bézier curve that gives a reasonable representation of the

letter C.

5. More complicated shapes can be represented by piecing together two or more Bézier curves.



Suppose the first Bézier curve has control points P0 , P1, P2 , P3 and the second one has control points P3 , P4 , P5 , P6. If we want these two pieces to join together smoothly, then the

tangents at P3 should match and so the points P2, P3, and P4 all have to lie on this common

tangent line. Using this principle, find control points for a pair of Bézier curves that represent the letter S.



Polar Coordinates



10.3



P (r,ă )



r



O



ă

polar axis



x



FIGURE 1



(r,ă )



ă+



ă

O



(_r,ă)



FIGURE 2



A coordinate system represents a point in the plane by an ordered pair of numbers called

coordinates. Usually we use Cartesian coordinates, which are directed distances from two

perpendicular axes. Here we describe a coordinate system introduced by Newton, called

the polar coordinate system, which is more convenient for many purposes.

We choose a point in the plane that is called the pole (or origin) and is labeled O. Then

we draw a ray (half-line) starting at O called the polar axis. This axis is usually drawn horizontally to the right and corresponds to the positive x-axis in Cartesian coordinates.

If P is any other point in the plane, let r be the distance from O to P and let ␪ be the angle

(usually measured in radians) between the polar axis and the line OP as in Figure 1. Then

the point P is represented by the ordered pair ͑r, ␪ ͒ and r, ␪ are called polar coordinates

of P. We use the convention that an angle is positive if measured in the counterclockwise

direction from the polar axis and negative in the clockwise direction. If P ෇ O, then r ෇ 0

and we agree that ͑0, ␪ ͒ represents the pole for any value of ␪.

We extend the meaning of polar coordinates ͑r, ␪ ͒ to the case in which r is negative by

agreeing that, as in Figure 2, the points ͑Ϫr, ␪ ͒ and ͑r, ␪ ͒ lie on the same line through O and

at the same distance r from O, but on opposite sides of O. If r Ͼ 0, the point ͑r, ␪ ͒ lies in

the same quadrant as ␪ ; if r Ͻ 0, it lies in the quadrant on the opposite side of the pole.

Notice that ͑Ϫr, ␪ ͒ represents the same point as ͑r, ␪ ϩ ␲͒.



Խ Խ



EXAMPLE 1 Plot the points whose polar coordinates are given.

(a) ͑1, 5␲͞4͒

(b) ͑2, 3␲͒

(c) ͑2, Ϫ2␲͞3͒

(d) ͑Ϫ3, 3␲͞4͒



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p670-679.qk_97817_10_ch10_p670-679 11/3/10 4:12 PM Page 679



SECTION 10.3



POLAR COORDINATES



679



SOLUTION The points are plotted in Figure 3. In part (d) the point ͑Ϫ3, 3␲͞4͒ is located



three units from the pole in the fourth quadrant because the angle 3␲͞4 is in the second

quadrant and r ෇ Ϫ3 is negative.





4





O



(2, 3π)





4



O

O



O



_







”1,      

4 ’





3





”2, _     



3



FIGURE 3



”_3,  3π

     ’

4



In the Cartesian coordinate system every point has only one representation, but in the

polar coordinate system each point has many representations. For instance, the point

͑1, 5␲͞4͒ in Example 1(a) could be written as ͑1, Ϫ3␲͞4͒ or ͑1, 13␲͞4͒ or ͑Ϫ1, ␲͞4͒. (See

Figure 4.)





4



13π

4



O

O



_ 3π

4



”1,  5π

     ’

4



”1, _  3π

   ’

4



π

4



O



O



”1,    13π

   ’

4



π



”_1,     ’

4



FIGURE 4



In fact, since a complete counterclockwise rotation is given by an angle 2␲, the point represented by polar coordinates ͑r, ␪ ͒ is also represented by

r, 2n



y

P (r,ă )=P (x,y)



r



y



cos ␪ ෇

x



x



͑Ϫr, ␪ ϩ ͑2n ϩ 1͒␲͒



where n is any integer.

The connection between polar and Cartesian coordinates can be seen from Figure 5, in

which the pole corresponds to the origin and the polar axis coincides with the positive

x-axis. If the point P has Cartesian coordinates ͑x, y͒ and polar coordinates r, , then, from

the figure, we have



ă

O



and



x

r



sin



y

r



and so



FIGURE 5



1



x ෇ r cos ␪



y ෇ r sin ␪



Although Equations 1 were deduced from Figure 5, which illustrates the case where

r Ͼ 0 and 0 Ͻ ␪ Ͻ ␲͞2, these equations are valid for all values of r and ␪. (See the general definition of sin ␪ and cos ␪ in Appendix D.)

Equations 1 allow us to find the Cartesian coordinates of a point when the polar coordinates are known. To find r and ␪ when x and y are known, we use the equations



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



97817_10_ch10_p680-689.qk_97817_10_ch10_p680-689 11/3/10 4:13 PM Page 680



680



CHAPTER 10



PARAMETRIC EQUATIONS AND POLAR COORDINATES



r2 ෇ x2 ϩ y2



2



tan ␪ ෇



y

x



which can be deduced from Equations 1 or simply read from Figure 5.

EXAMPLE 2 Convert the point ͑2, ␲͞3͒ from polar to Cartesian coordinates.

SOLUTION Since r ෇ 2 and



␪ ෇ ␲͞3, Equations 1 give



x ෇ r cos ␪ ෇ 2 cos

y ෇ r sin ␪ ෇ 2 sin





1

෇2ؒ ෇1

3

2



s3

෇2ؒ

෇ s3

3

2



Therefore the point is (1, s3 ) in Cartesian coordinates.

EXAMPLE 3 Represent the point with Cartesian coordinates ͑1, Ϫ1͒ in terms of polar



coordinates.

SOLUTION If we choose r to be positive, then Equations 2 give



r ෇ sx 2 ϩ y 2 ෇ s1 2 ϩ ͑Ϫ1͒ 2 ෇ s2

tan ␪ ෇



y

෇ Ϫ1

x



Since the point ͑1, Ϫ1͒ lies in the fourth quadrant, we can choose ␪ ෇ Ϫ␲͞4 or

␪ ෇ 7␲͞4. Thus one possible answer is (s2 , Ϫ␲͞4); another is ͑s2 , 7␲͞4͒.

NOTE Equations 2 do not uniquely determine ␪ when x and y are given because, as ␪

increases through the interval 0 ഛ ␪ Ͻ 2␲, each value of tan ␪ occurs twice. Therefore, in

converting from Cartesian to polar coordinates, it’s not good enough just to find r and ␪

that satisfy Equations 2. As in Example 3, we must choose ␪ so that the point ͑r, ␪ ͒ lies in

the correct quadrant.

1



Polar Curves



r= 2



r=4



The graph of a polar equation r ෇ f ͑␪ ͒, or more generally F͑r, ␪ ͒ ෇ 0, consists of all

points P that have at least one polar representation ͑r, ␪ ͒ whose coordinates satisfy the

equation.



r=2

r=1

x



v



EXAMPLE 4 What curve is represented by the polar equation r ෇ 2?



SOLUTION The curve consists of all points ͑r, ␪ ͒ with r ෇ 2. Since r represents the dis-



FIGURE 6



tance from the point to the pole, the curve r ෇ 2 represents the circle with center O and

radius 2. In general, the equation r ෇ a represents a circle with center O and radius a .

(See Figure 6.)



Խ Խ



Copyright 2010 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s).

Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.



Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

2: Calculus with Parametric Curves

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay(0 tr)

×