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III. Which word has the same meaning as each of the underlined words:

III. Which word has the same meaning as each of the underlined words:

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B. GRAMMAR:

Questions - Passive voice

I. Make questions for the underlined parts:

1- The social work profession draws on the theories of human development.

2- There is a great deal of translation social and psychological research.

3- Many social worker practitioners continue to look to their own experience for knowledge.

4- The combining of these two types of knowledge is often imperfect.

5- A hopeful development for bridging this gap is the compilation.

II. Translate into English:

1- Lý thuyết về sự phát triển của con người đang được nhân viên CTXH sử dụng trong

chuyên ngành.

2- Các tình huống phức tạp được nhân viên CTXH phân tích nhờ lý thuyết hệ thống xã hội

và hành vi ứng xử.

3- Các kết quả nghiên cứu và kinh nghiệm của các nhà thực hành có tiếng được thu thập cho

các nhân viên CTXH sau này.

4- Những điểm yếu và điểm mạnh của công nghệ thông tin đã được khắc phục nhờ cách

mạng tin học.



FURTHER READINGS

1. Ethical Principles

The following broad ethical principles are based on social work’s core values of service,

social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity,

and competence. These principles set forth ideals to which all social workers should aspire.

Value: Service

Ethical Principle: Social workers’ primary goal is to help people in need and to

address social problems.

Social workers elevate service to others above self-interest. Social workers draw on their

knowledge, values, and skills to help people in need and to address social problems. Social

workers are encouraged to volunteer some portion of their professional skills with no

expectation of significant financial return (pro bono service).

Value: Social Justice

Ethical Principle: Social workers challenge social injustice.

Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and

oppressed individuals and groups of people. Social workers’ social change efforts are

focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of

social injustice. These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about

oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers strive to ensure access to

needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful

participation in decision making for all people.

Value: Dignity and Worth of the Person Ethical Principle: Social workers respect the

inherent dignity and worth of the person.

Social workers treat each person in a caring and respectful fashion, mindful of individual

differences and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers promote clients’ socially

responsible self-determination. Social workers seek to enhance clients’ capacity and

opportunity to change and to address their own needs. Social workers are cognizant of their

dual responsibility to clients and to the broader society. They seek to resolve conflicts

between clients’ interests and the broader society’s interests in a socially responsible manner

consistent with the values, ethical principles, and ethical standards of the profession.

Value: Importance of Human Relationships

Ethical Principle: Social workers recognize the central importance of human

relationships.

Social workers understand that relationships between and among people are an important

vehicle for change. Social workers engage people as partners in the helping process. Social

workers seek to strengthen relationships among people in a purposeful effort to promote,

restore, maintain, and enhance the well-being of individuals, families, social groups,

organizations, and communities.



Value: Integrity

Ethical Principle: Social workers behave in a trustworthy manner.

Social workers are continually aware of the profession’s mission, values, ethical principles,

and ethical standards and practice in a manner consistent with them. Social workers act

honestly and responsibly and promote ethical practices on the part of the organizations with

which they are affiliated.

Value: Competence

Ethical Principle: Social workers practice within their areas of

develop and enhance their professional expertise.



competence



and



Social workers continually strive to increase their professional knowledge and skills and to

apply them in practice. Social workers should aspire to contribute to the knowledge base of

the profession. These ethical principles are part of the Code of Ethics of the National

Association of Social Workers, approved by the 1996 NASW Delegate Assembly and

revised by the 1999 NASW Delegate Assembly. The complete text of the Code is available on

request from NASW or at www.socialworkers.org. *The complete text of the NASW

Standards for Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice and the NASW Standards for

Continuing Professional Education is available on request from NASW or at

www.socialworkers.org. Adopted by the NASW Board of Directors June 28, 2002



2. Role of the professional social worker

Main article: Role of the professional social worker

Professional social workers have a strong tradition of working for social justice and

of refusing to recreate unequal social structures. The main tasks of professional social

workers can include a variety of services such as case management (linking clients with

agencies and programs that will meet their psychosocial needs), medical social work,

counseling (psychotherapy), human services management, social welfare policy analysis,

community organizing, advocacy, teaching (in schools of social work), and social science

research. Professional social workers work in a variety of settings, including: non-profit or

public social service agencies, grassroots advocacy organizations, hospitals, hospices,

community health agencies, schools, faith-based organizations, and even the military. Some

social workers work as psychotherapists, counselors, or mental health practitioners, often

working in collaboration with psychiatrists, psychologists, or other medical professionals.

Social workers may also work independently as private practice psychotherapists in the

United States and are able to bill most third party payers such as insurance companies.

Additionally, some social workers focus their efforts on social policy or conduct academic

research into the practice or ethics of social work. The emphasis has varied among these

task areas by historical era and country. Some of these areas have been the subject of

controversy as to whether they are properly part of social work's mission.



A variety of settings employ social workers, including governmental departments

(especially in the areas of child and family welfare, mental health, correctional services, and

education departments), hospitals, non-government welfare agencies and private practice working independently as counselors, family therapists or researchers.

3. JOB OUTLOOK

Employment for social workers is expected grow much faster than the average for all

occupations through 2016. Job prospects are expected to be favorable, particularly for social

workers who specialize in the aging population or work in rural areas.

Employment change. Employment of social workers is expected to increase by 22

percent during the 2006-16 decade, which is much faster than the average for all

occupations. The growing elderly population and the aging baby boom generation will

create greater demand for health and social services, resulting in rapid job growth among

gerontology social workers. Employment of social workers in private social service

agencies also will increase. However, agencies increasingly will restructure services and

hire more social and human service assistants, who are paid less, instead of social workers.

Employment in State and local government agencies may grow somewhat in response to

growing needs for public welfare, family services, and child protective services, but many

of these services will be contracted out to private agencies. Employment levels in public and

private social services agencies may fluctuate, depending on need and government funding

levels.

Opportunities for social workers in private practice will expand, but growth may be

somewhat hindered by restrictions that managed care organizations put on mental health

services. The growing popularity of employee assistance programs is expected to spur

demand for private practitioners, some of whom provide social work services to

corporations on a contractual basis. However, the popularity of employee assistance

programs will fluctuate with the business cycle because businesses are not likely to offer

these services during recessions.

Job prospects. Job prospects are generally expected to be favorable. Many job

openings will stem from growth and the need to replace social workers who leave the

occupation. However, competition for social worker jobs is expected in cities, where

training programs for social workers are prevalent. Opportunities should be good in rural

areas, which often find it difficult to attract and retain qualified staff. By specialty, job

prospects may be best for those social workers with a background in gerontology and

substance abuse treatment.

Employment of child, family and school social workers is expected to grow by 19

percent, which is faster than the average for all occupations. One of the major contributing

factors is the rise in the elderly population. Social workers, particularly family social

workers, will be needed to assist in finding the best care for the aging and to support their



families. Furthermore, demand for school social workers will increase and lead to more jobs

as efforts are expanded to respond to rising student enrollments as well as the continued

emphasis on integrating disabled children into the general school population. There could be

competition for school social work jobs in some areas because of the limited number of

openings. The availability of Federal, State, and local funding will be a major factor in

determining the actual job growth in schools. The demand for child and family social

workers may also be tied to the availability of government funding.

Mental health and substance abuse social workers will grow by 30 percent, which is

much faster than the average, over the 2006-16 decade. In particular, social workers

specializing in substance abuse will experience strong demand. Substance abusers are

increasingly being placed into treatment programs instead of being sentenced to prison. Also,

growing numbers of the substance abusers sentenced to prison or probation are, increasingly

being required by correctional systems to have substance abuse treatment added as a

condition to their sentence or probation. As this trend grows, demand will strengthen for

treatment programs and social workers to assist abusers on the road to recovery.

Growth of medical and public health social workers is expected to be 24 percent,

which is much faster than the average for all occupations. Hospitals continue to limit the

length of patient stays, so the demand for social workers in hospitals will grow more slowly

than in other areas. But hospitals are releasing patients earlier than in the past, so social

worker employment in home health care services is growing. However, the expanding

senior population is an even larger factor. Employment opportunities for social workers

with backgrounds in gerontology should be good in the growing numbers of assisted-living

and senior-living communities. The expanding senior population also will spur demand for

social workers in nursing homes, long-term care facilities, and hospices. However, in these

settings other types of workers are often being given tasks that were previously done by

social workers.

Projections data from the National Employment Matrix

Projected

Occupational SOC Employment employmen

t, 2016

title

, 2006

Code



Social workers

Child, family,

and school

social

workers



211020

211021



595,000



282,000



40



Change,

2006Detailed

16

statistics

Numbe Percen

r

t



727,00

0



132,00

0



22



PDF



zipped

XLS



336,00

0



54,000



19



PDF



zipped

XLS



Projections data from the National Employment Matrix

Projected

Occupational SOC Employment employmen

t, 2016

title

, 2006

Code



Change,

2006Detailed

16

statistics

Numbe Percen

r

t



Medical and

public health

social workers



211022



124,000



154,000



30,00

0



24



PDF



zipped

XLS



Mental health

and substance

abuse social

workers



211023



122,000



159,000



37,00

0



30



PDF



zipped

XLS



Social workers, 21all other

1029



66,000



78,000



12,00

0



18



PDF



zipped

XLS



.



4. EARNINGS

Median annual earnings of child, family, and school social workers were $37,480 in

May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $29,590 and $49,060. The lowest 10

percent earned less than $24,480, and the top 10 percent earned more than $62,530. Median

annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of child, family, and school

social workers in May 2006 were:

Elementary and secondary schools



$48,360



Local government



43,500



State government



39,000



Individual and family services



32,680



Other residential care facilities



32,590



Median annual earnings of medical and public health social workers were $43,040 in

May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $34,110 and $53,740. The lowest 10

percent earned less than $27,280, and the top 10 percent earned more than $64,070. Median

annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of medical and public

health social workers in May 2006 were:

General medical and surgical hospitals



$48,420



Home health care services



44,470

41



Local government



41,590



Nursing care facilities



38,550



Individual and family services



35,510



Median annual earnings of mental health and substance abuse social workers were

$35,410 in May 2006. The middle 50 percent earned between $27,940 and $45,720. The

lowest 10 percent earned less than $22,490, and the top 10 percent earned more than

$57,630. Median annual earnings in the industries employing the largest numbers of mental

health and substance abuse social workers in May 2006 were:

Local government



$39,550



Psychiatric and substance abuse hospitals



39,240



Individual and family services



34,920



Residential mental retardation,

substance abuse facilities



mental



health



Outpatient mental health and substance abuse centers



and



30,590

34,290



Median annual earnings of social workers, all other were $43,580 in May 2006. The

middle 50 percent earned between $32,530 and $56,420. The lowest 10 percent earned less

than $25,540, and the top 10 percent earned more than $68,500. Median annual earnings in

the industries employing the largest numbers of social workers, all other in May 2006 were:

Local government



$46,330



State government



45,070



Individual and family services



35,150



About 20 percent of social workers are members of a union. Many belong to the union that

represents workers in other occupations at their place of employment.

5.



PROFESSIONAL AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS

(Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2008-09 Edition )

Through direct counseling or referral to other services, social workers help people

solve a range of personal problems. Workers in occupations with similar duties include the

clergy, counselors, probation officers and correctional treatment specialists, psychologists,

and social and human services assistants.

42



Audio-visual collections specialists



(O*NET 25-9011.00)



Prepare, plan, and operate audio-visual teaching aids for use in education. May

record, catalogue, and file audio-visual materials.





2006 employment: 7,300







Projected 2006-16 employment change: Decline rapidly







Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor's degree



Clergy



(O*NET 21-2011.00)



Conduct religious worship and perform other spiritual functions associated with

beliefs and practices of religious faith or denomination. Provide spiritual and moral

guidance and assistance to members.





2006 employment: 404,000







Projected 2006-16 employment change: Faster than average







Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Master’s degree



Dietetic technicians



(O*NET 29-2051.00)



Assist dieticians in the provision of food service and nutritional programs. Under the

supervision of dieticians, may plan and produce meals based on established guidelines,

teach principles of food and nutrition, or counsel individuals.





2006 employment: 25,000







Projected 2006-16 employment change: Faster than average







Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Postsecondary

vocational award



Directors, religious activities and education



(O*NET 21-2021.00)



Direct and coordinate activities of a denominational group to meet religious needs of

students. Plan, direct, or coordinate church school programs designed to promote religious

education among church membership. May provide counseling and guidance relative to

marital, health, financial, or religious problems.

43







2006 employment: 99,000







Projected 2006-16 employment change: Faster than average







Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor’s degree



Farm and home management advisors



(O*NET 25-9021.00)



Advise, instruct, and assist individuals and families engaged in agriculture,

agricultural-related processes, or home economics activities. Demonstrate procedures and

apply research findings to solve problems; instruct and train in product development, sales,

and the utilization of machinery and equipment to promote general welfare. Include county

agricultural agents, feed and farm management advisors, home economists, and extension

service advisors.





2006 employment: 15,000







Projected 2006-16 employment change: More slowly than average







Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor’s degree



Law clerks



(O*NET 23-2092.00)



Assist lawyers or judges by researching or preparing legal documents. May meet

with clients or assist lawyers and judges in court. Excludes lawyers, and paralegal and legal

assistants.





2006 employment: 37,000







Projected 2006-16 employment change: Little or no change







Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Bachelor’s degree



Mathematical technicians



(O*NET 15-2091.00)



Apply standardized mathematical formulas, principles, and methodology to

technological problems in engineering and physical sciences in relation to specific industrial

and research objectives, processes, equipment, and products.





2006 employment: 1,300







Projected 2006-16 employment change: About as fast as average







Most significant source of postsecondary education or training: Master’s degree

44



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III. Which word has the same meaning as each of the underlined words:

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