Tải bản đầy đủ - 0 (trang)
1Objective: Safety of transport in 2020

1Objective: Safety of transport in 2020

Tải bản đầy đủ - 0trang

Safety of transport issues

Eight issues have been identified for the Safety of transport theme. Results and activities

have been specified for each of these issues. The issues are:

1. Safety risk to train passengers

2.Accidents involving passenger, freight and other trains

3.Railway infrastructure

4.Rolling stock

5.Railway tunnels

6.Disaster organisation and crisis control

7.Security

8.Personal security

Technical, process and conduct factors play a role in the assurances for safety with respect

to these issues: for example, in addition to the technical specifications of importance to

the safety of rolling stock (technical factor), the planning of maintenance (process factor)

and use of the rolling stock (conduct) are also important. These three factors are, where

relevant, included in the review of the issues in the following subsections.

Information about the implications of the Safety of transport objective for safety management and the safety culture is given in the subsections on safety management and the safety

culture enclosed in Section 8.

The issues exhibit a certain hierarchy: for example, an increase in the safety of the infrastructure and rolling stock results in a reduction of the number of accidents, and a

reduction in the number of accidents results in an increase in the safety of passengers.



5.2 Safety risk to train passengers

Insights from the evaluation of the Second Railway

Safety Framework Document

The safety of passengers has increased in the past period. In the years since 1995

the number of fatalities amongst railway passengers has remained below the target

specified in the Second Framework Document. The number of injured train

passengers is decreasing, but is still above the target. It would appear that although

NS Dutch Railways has improved the departure procedure, the ambition to reduce

the number of injuries occurring when embarking/disembarking from trains has not

been fulfilled. It should be noted that although the definition of 'passenger' used in

the records of injured passengers has been tightened, the records are still unreliable: some injuries are not recorded and some incidents cannot be imputed to

passenger transport (in particular, the embarking/disembarking procedure).



Results

The safety risk to train passengers has decreased further in 2020 as compared to the current

situation and is low in comparison with other European countries.



The Railways: safety of transport, safety of work and safety of life | 41



Responsible parties



Carriers, infrastructure manager, Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water

Management, Inspectorate for Transport, Public Works and Water Management (IVW)

Indicators and targets



Indicator55



Target



FWSI amongst passengers / year /

thousand million passenger train

kilometres



National Reference Value;

permanent improvement

Structural ranking among the EU top 5



FWSI57 amongst passengers / year /

thousand million passenger kilometres



National Reference Value;

permanent improvement

Structural ranking among the EU top 4



Number of seriously-injured passengers

per year



for the purposes of information58



Number of deaths of passengers per year



for the purposes of information



Number of slightly-injured passengers / year /

thousand million passenger kilometres59



Rolling target:

permanent improvement



56



The NRVs and the other rolling targets are determined at periodic intervals in accordance

with the system described in subsections 4.2.3 and 4.2.4.

An unequivocal definition of 'slightly-injured passenger' required for the determination

of the number of slightly-injured passengers is currently lacking. The activities include the

specification of a definition and an improvement of the records of the number of injured

passengers (see the Activities subsection).



Passenger risk in the EU

The latest National Reference Values for passenger fatalities adopted for the

EU Member States are – for the purposes of illustration – listed below. The NRVs

are calculated from the figures the Member States submitted for the years

2004-2007. It should be noted that the definitions adopted by various Member

States still exhibited differences during these years and for these reason objective

comparisons of the NRVs for the various Member States are not yet feasible.

The European obligation to make use of the Common Safety Indicators will result

in the gradual disappearance of these differences in the coming years. This will

improve the feasibility of comparisons of the figures. However, and with the

necessary reservations in view of the different definitions used by the different

Member States, the latest rankings reveal that the Netherlands is sixth and fifth

in the passenger safety rankings.



 he indicators and standards adopted at a European level are shown in bold text.

T

FWSI is the abbreviation of Fatalities and Weighted Serious Injuries, a weighted average The weighted

average is determined by considering 1 serious injury statistically equivalent to 0.1 fatalities.

57

Ditto.

58

These indicators are included for the purposes of information. Although information about the number of

fatalities and serious injuries among passengers is certainly of interest, the risk to passengers is already

specified (and standardised) by the two FWSI indicators.

59

The definition of slightly-injured passengers is compatible with the European definition of 'passenger'.

Consequently, a distinction is made between ‘in the train’ and ‘when embarking/disembarking’.

55



56



42 | Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management



Member State



NRV (passenger train kilometres)



1. Sweden



5.70



2. Ireland



6.22



3. United Kingdom



6.22



4. Denmark



7.55



5. Germany



10.9



6. Netherlands



11.7



7. Slovenia



11.8



8. Slovakia



17.7



9. France



21.9



10.Finland



26.8



EURV



34.4



Member State



NRV (passenger kilometres)



1. Sweden



0.0557



2. Ireland



0.0623



3. United Kingdom



0.0623



4. Denmark



0.0903



5. Netherlands



0.0941



6. France



0.109



7. Germany



0.11



8. Slovenia



0.175



9. Luxembourg



0.225



10.Finland



0.248



EURV



0.288



Source: European Railway Agency



Activities

The activities that are being carried out to achieve the required results (and, consequently,

the objective) are summarised below. The parties involved are enclosed between brackets

and the lead party or parties are in bold text.

1. The specification of a shared standard definition of slightly-injured passengers. (IVW,

carriers, infrastructure manager(s) and the Ministry of Transport, Public Works and

Water Management)

2.The standardisation and improvement of the records of slightly-injured passengers.

(Carriers, infrastructure manager(s) and IVW)

3.The – in part on the basis of the improved records – performance of an analysis of the

cause of accidents occurring when embarking/disembarking from trains (other than due

to accidents) and of the feasibility of reducing this risk and improving passenger safety.

The passengers' experiences will also be reviewed in the analysis. (Carriers, infrastructure

manager(s), IVW and passengers)



The Railways: safety of transport, safety of work and safety of life | 43



5.3 Accidents involving passenger, freight and other trains

Insights from the evaluation of the Second Railway

Safety Framework Document

No accidents on level crossings resulting in fatalities amongst passengers have

occurred since 1993. The number of incidents with potentially serious consequences

(derailments and collisions between and with trains60) exhibits a neutral to

favourable trend and is relatively low in comparison with other European countries.

Virtually the entire railway network is equipped with an automatic train protection

system. A derailment that occurred in Amsterdam in 2004 has resulted in the SPAD

issue being put high on the agenda. The railway sector has since drawn up a

separate programme for the reduction of the number of SPADs. However, it is

unlikely that the SPAD targets will be achieved by as early as 2009. A study of the

approach to SPADs is being carried out at present, in part in response to the serious

train accident that occurred in September 200961. The results from this study could

give cause to a further review of the policy.



60

61



 his relates to collisions on level crossings.

T

Two freight trains collided near Barendrecht on 24 September 2009 after one of the trains passed a signal

at danger.



44 | Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management



Results

The number of accidents involving passenger, goods and other trains has decreased

in 2020 as compared to the current situation and is low in comparison with other

European countries.

Responsible parties



Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management, Inspectorate for Transport,

Public Works and Water Management (IVW), Dutch Safety Board, carriers, infrastructure

manager, contractors.

Indicators and targets



Indicator62



Target



Total number of accidents / million train

kilometres



Rolling target: permanent improvement



Number of train collisions / million train

kilometres



Rolling target: permanent improvement



Number of derailments / million train

kilometres



Rolling target: permanent improvement



Number of collisions on level crossings /

million train kilometres



Rolling target: permanent improvement



Number of accidents to persons caused by

rolling stock in motion / million train

kilometres



Rolling target: permanent improvement



Number of fires in rolling stock / million

train kilometres



Rolling target: permanent improvement



Number of other accidents / million train

kilometres



Rolling target: permanent improvement



Number of wrong-side signalling failures /

million train kilometres



Rolling target: permanent improvement



Number of SPADs (/ million train

kilometres)



In 2010: 50% reduction as compared to 2003

Thereafter: permanent improvement



Risk due to SPADs



In 2010: 75% reduction as compared to 2003

Thereafter: permanent improvement



The rolling targets are determined at periodic intervals in accordance with the system

described in subsections 4.2.3 and 4.2.4.

Some data required for the determination of the rolling targets for the various types of

accidents are currently lacking. The collection of this data is included in the list of activities

(see the Activities subsection below).

The target for SPADs specified in the Second Framework Document has not been

achieved to date and, consequently is retained for the time being. This target specifies

a 50% reduction of the number of SPADs and a 75% reduction of the risk in 2010 as

compared to 2003. Once these targets have been achieved the 'permanent improvement'

target will be adopted.

Activities

The activities that are being carried out to achieve the required results (and, consequently,

the objective) are summarised below. The parties involved are enclosed between brackets

and the lead party or parties are in bold text.

62



The indicators and targets adopted at a European level are shown in bold text.

The Railways: safety of transport, safety of work and safety of life | 45



Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

1Objective: Safety of transport in 2020

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay(0 tr)

×