Tải bản đầy đủ - 0 (trang)
Chapter 9. Keys to Information Quality in Informational Web Pages

Chapter 9. Keys to Information Quality in Informational Web Pages

Tải bản đầy đủ - 0trang

74



Web Wisdom: How to Evaluate and Create Information Quality on the Web

AUTH 1.1

Agency responsible for site clearly indicated



NAV 4.1

URL for site



NAV 5.1

Site index



NAV 6.1

Internal search

engine



Availability

of RSS feeds

and

podcasts



AUTH 1.3

Contact information

for agency provided



NAV 5.1

Site map



COV/IA 2.2

Sections of site designed for

specific audiences



Figure 9.1  An informational home page. RSS, Really Simple Syndication. (Reprinted from

U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Food and Drug Administration [home page], U.S. Food

and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, n.d., http://www.fda.gov/default.htm [accessed

April 3, 2009].)



When analyzing an informational Web page, the first step is to ask the general

questions listed in the Checklist of Basic Elements. In addition, a user must also

apply the checklist questions from the Informational Checklist to determine:

• The nature of the information provider.

• Whether the information is likely to be reliable, authoritative, and trustworthy.

• Whether the information at the site is relevant to the user’s information needs.



Keys to Information Quality in Informational Web Pages

AUTH 1.1

Organization responsible for

page’s content clearly indicated



COV/IA 1.1

Table of contents of

materials provided



75



NONTX 1.4

Links to additional software needed

to access portions of site provided



CUR 1.1

Dates materials

first issued



Figure 9.2  An informational Web page. (From U.S. Food and Drug Administration,

Center for Veterinary Medicine [CVM], CVM and animal cloning, U.S. Food and Drug

Administration, Center for Veterinary Medicine, Rockville, MD, page updated January 31,

2008, http://www.fda.gov/cvm/cloning.htm [accessed April 3, 2009].)



Figure 9.2, also from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Web site, shows

some additional elements that should be incorporated into a well-designed informational page. Meanwhile, Figure  9.3, a page from the U.S. Department of

Transportation Research, and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA),

Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Web site illustrates features important to include

when presenting statistics on an informational page.



The Informational Web Page Checklist: Keys to

Evaluating and Creating Informational Web Pages

The primary purpose of an informational Web page is to provide factual information.

The following questions are intended to complement the general questions found in

the Checklist of Basic Elements. The greater the number of “yes” answers to questions on both the Checklist of Basic Elements and the Informational Checklist, the

greater the likelihood that the quality of information in an informational Web page

can be determined.



76



Web Wisdom: How to Evaluate and Create Information Quality on the Web



Printer friendly

version of table



ACC 1.4

Table clearly

labeled



OBJ 1.4

Page free of advertising

AUTH 1.1

Name of agency responsible for site



ACC 1.2

Sources of factual information provided



NONTX 1.2

Links to additional software needed

to access portions of site



AUTH 1.3

Contact information for agency

responsible for site provided



Figure 9.3  An informational Web page presenting statistics. (Reprinted from U.S.

Department of Transportation, Research and Innovative Technology Administration [RITA],

Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Table 4-46: Estimated national emissions of lead (thousand

short tons), U.S. Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics, Washington,

DC, n.d., http://www.bts.gov/publications/national_transportation_statistics/html/table_04_46.

html [accessed April 3, 2009].)



Keys to Information Quality in Informational Web Pages



77



If the page you are analyzing is not a home page, it is important to return to the

site’s home page to answer the questions in the Authority of the Site’s Home Page

section of the checklist.



Authority

Authority of the Site’s Home Page

The following information should be included either on the site’s home page or on a

page directly linked to the home page.

If an organization is responsible for providing the information:

• Is there a listing of the names and qualifications of any individuals who are

responsible for overseeing the organization (such as a board of directors)?

AUTH 1.7

• Is there an indication of whether the organization has a presence beyond the

Web? For example, does it provide printed materials? AUTH 1.8

• Is there a listing of materials produced by the organization and information

about how they can be obtained? AUTH 1.10

• Is there a listing of significant employees and their qualifications? AUTH 1.13



Accuracy

• If the work is original research by the author, is this clearly indicated?

ACC 1.3

• Is there an indication that the information has been reviewed for accuracy

by an editor or fact-checker or through a peer review process? ACC 1.5



Currency

• If the page includes time-sensitive information, is the frequency of updates

described? CUR 1.5

• If the page includes statistical data, is the date the statistics were collected

clearly indicated? CUR 1.6

• If the same information is also published in a print source, such as an online

dictionary with a print counterpart, is it clear which print edition was the

source of the information (i.e., are the title, author, publisher, and date of the

print publication listed)? CUR 1.7



Coverage and Intended Audience

• Is there a print equivalent to the Web page? If so, is it clear whether the

entire work is available on the Web? COV/IA 1.3

• If there is a print equivalent to the Web page, is it clear whether the Web

version includes additional information not contained in the print version?

COV/IA 1.4

• If the material is from a work that is out of copyright, is it clear whether and

to what extent the material has been updated? COV/IA 1.5



to Information

10 Keys

Quality in News

Web Pages

Keys to Recognizing A News Web Page

The primary purpose of a news Web page is to provide current information on

local, regional, national, or international events. There are also numerous news sites

devoted to one particular topic, such as business news, technology news, legal news,

and so forth. The site may or may not have a print or broadcast equivalent. For

organizations that have a non-Web counterpart, the Web version may or may not

duplicate it.

Examples of some organizations with news Web sites include newspapers with a

print counterpart, television and radio stations, and Web-based news organizations

without a print counterpart. The URL address of a news page frequently ends in

.com (commercial).

A “yes” answer to either of the following questions provides a good indication

that the primary purpose of the page you are analyzing is to provide news. Does the

page:

• Provide current information on local, regional, national, or international

events?

• Provide current information on a specific topic such as business, computers,

or entertainment?



Analysis of News Web Pages

The home page of the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Online

Newsroom (Figure  10.1) and an additional page from the same site (Figure  10.2)

provide examples of many of the elements that are important to include on news Web

pages:











The name of the organization responsible for the contents of the site

The date and time the page was last updated and reviewed

Contact information for the newsroom staff

An overview of the topics covered on the page



79



80



Web Wisdom: How to Evaluate and Create Information Quality on the Web

NAV 5.1

Site index



AUTH 1.1

Agency

responsible

for the site’s

content

clearly

indicated

COV/IA 1.1

Clear

indication

of the

types of

materials

included



Users can subscribe to email updates



AUTH 1.3

Methods to contact newsroom staff provided



Size of

text on

page can

be

modified

by user

Press

releases

also

provided

in Spanish



CUR 1.1

Dates of press

releases

provided



Mechanism to help facilitate

Availability of RSS feeds and

the sharing of information

podcasts

from site via social media

CUR 1.3

Date page last updated and reviewed

Disclaimer

NAV 1.5

Index and site map



Figure 10.1  A news home page. (Reprinted from U.S. Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention [CDC], 2009-b, CDC online newsroom [page last updated April 2, 2009], U.S.

CDC, Atlanta, GA, http://www.cdc.gov/media/ [accessed April 3, 2009].)



Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

Chapter 9. Keys to Information Quality in Informational Web Pages

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay(0 tr)

×