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I Have , Who Has ?

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look at the ‘‘I have

’’ (answer) portions of their cards to see whether

they might have the correct response. The player with the proper answer

then calls out his or her ‘‘I have ’’ (correct answer), and, if all agree, then

’’ (new question) portion of his or her

reads aloud the ‘‘Who has

card. Play continues in this manner until each player has both correctly

answered a question (assistance may be provided) and has asked a

question of the other players. (Note: If there are exactly the same number

of playing cards and players, the final answer will be on the designated

leader’s card. In other words, play will come back to the leader. If there

are more cards than players, some players should hold two cards.)



Example:

In the situation shown here

(for just four players), John, as

the designated leader, called

out ‘‘Who has 8 + 9?’’ Sara

responded, ‘‘I have 17’’ and,

after a pause to determine if all

agreed, read aloud, ‘‘Who has

the number of wheels on 4 tricycles?’’ In turn, Amber

responded, ‘‘I have 12,’’

and then called out, ‘‘Who

has 6 × 4 − 5?’’ Jose read,

‘‘I have 19,’’ and then

asked,

‘‘Who

has

the

number of ears on 8 students?’’

John stated, ‘‘I have 16.’’ This

completed the game, because

John, as the leader, had asked

the first question and now had

answered the final question.



Extension:

The following I Have

, Who Has

? activity has been set up

with relatively easy problems. Cut out the cards, distribute one to each

player (if there are fewer than thirty players, some may need to hold

more than one card), and allow the students to play and enjoy this

sample game while also learning the procedure. Next, make copies of

the blank game cards; fill in appropriate questions and responses so

that students can enjoy playing while also enhancing mental-math and

logical-thinking skills. (Note: If the students are able, challenge them to

create their own cards.)



I Have



, Who Has



?



183



, Who Has



?



I HAVE 100



I HAVE 3



I HAVE 27



WHO HAS 2 + 2?



WHO HAS 30 – 4?



WHO HAS the number of ears on

8 students?



I HAVE 30



I HAVE 11



I HAVE 21



WHO HAS 15 – 5?



WHO HAS 6 + 6?



WHO HAS 11 + 11?



I HAVE 8



I HAVE 15



I HAVE 29



WHO HAS the number of legs on

5 dogs?



WHO HAS 4 × 7?



WHO HAS 10 + 10 + 3?



I HAVE 24



I HAVE 14



I HAVE 18



WHO HAS the number of sides on

a hexagon?



WHO HAS 5 + 5 + 3?



WHO HAS 20 – 3?



I HAVE 1



I HAVE 7



I HAVE 9



WHO HAS 30 – 28?



WHO HAS 5 x 5?



WHO HAS 20 – 1?



I HAVE 2



I HAVE 25



I HAVE 19



WHO HAS 3 + 4?



WHO HAS 3 + 3 + 3?



WHO HAS 10 x 10?



I HAVE 6



I HAVE 13



I HAVE 17



WHO HAS 7 + 7?



WHO HAS 20 – 2?



WHO HAS 100 – 99?



I HAVE 20



I HAVE 28



I HAVE 23



WHO HAS the number of wheels

on 5 tricycles?



WHO HAS 30 – 1?



WHO HAS 8 + 8 + 8?



I HAVE 10



I HAVE 12



I HAVE 22



WHO HAS 5 + 6?



WHO HAS 30 – 9?



WHO HAS 5 + 3?



I HAVE 4



I HAVE 26



I HAVE 16



WHO HAS the number of sides on

a triangle?



WHO HAS 9 + 9 + 9?



WHO HAS 40 – 10?



184



Computation Connections



Copyright © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



I Have



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, Who Has



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Copyright © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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185



Chapter 50



Number Grids

Grades 3–8

×



×



×







×





Total group activity

Cooperative activity

Independent activity

Concrete/manipulative activity

Visual/pictorial activity

Abstract procedure



Why Do It:

This activity challenges students to locate equations that

involve more than one operation, encouraging practice with

addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.



You Will Need:

At first students can use a prepared Number Grid (sample provided). Once they are familiar with the activity, the students

might devise Number Grids for each other (see Extension 2).

Also needed is a pencil for each group and colored pencils

or pens.



How To Do It:

A Number Grid, a chart with 14 rows and 7 numbers in

each row, is provided as a starting point for this activity.

It is best to have students work in groups on the Number

Grid provided. Students will use a pencil or pen to loop

and label as many correct equations as possible on their

grid. Using different colors is recommended if overlapping

equations are allowed. The numerals for an equation must be



186



in adjacent spaces. Give students time to work, and then discuss their

findings. If desired, use an overhead transparency of the same Number

Grid on which the students are working to draw attention to certain

equations, in which case each student should contribute one or more

looped equations to the display.



Example:



7



3



21



4



5



9



6







6



8



25



1



14



7







5



8



×



=



27



=



+



2



×



45



=



Several equations are looped on the sample Number Grid below. Notice

that some involve a single operation, whereas others use several.



14



3



=



11



Extensions:

1. If students require practice with a certain operation, such as

multiplication, ask them to loop only multiplication equations.

2. Students can easily devise a grid to be used by the class. This

is easily done by placing the numerals for previously selected

equations in adjacent spaces on a blank grid (graph paper works

well) and then filling the remaining spaces with other numbers.

Once completed, a student’s grid might be photocopied and tried

by several other students.

3. Advanced players can restrict themselves to finding equations that

use at least three of the four basic operations.

4. A long-term game may run on for several days and involve having

the players work on the grid at home. Students may be allowed

to receive help from friends, parents, or anyone who wishes

to contribute. In such a situation, be certain that students use

different colored pens or pencils and have the equations written

on additional paper for easier verification. The players may wish

to check one another’s work. Calculators may be helpful, because

most models use the proper order of operations. Be prepared to

find more than 100 equations on most one-page grids.



Number Grids



187



45



6



81



42



7



6



19



5



2



27



8



6



8



25



9



7



3



5



1



14



7



21



4



9



6



14



3



11



56



7



28



2



15



2



9



3



18



2



3



10



8



3



36



9



14



2



28



42



7



4



5



7



56



9



6



4



20



4



2



70



3



14



24



80



1



28



35



17



22



6



4



19



7



35



29



2



16



15



0



5



1



10



11



2



60



19



12



69



5



22



8



67



34



24



105



79



57



32



188



Computation Connections



Copyright © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



Number Grid



Chapter 51



Here I Am

Grades 3–8

×



×









×





Total group activity

Cooperative activity

Independent activity

Concrete/manipulative activity

Visual/pictorial activity

Abstract procedure



Why Do It:

Students will reinforce their knowledge of multiplication

facts, stimulate logical thinking, and enhance coordinategraphing skills.



You Will Need:

This game requires a ‘‘master’’ multiplication game board

with answers and several enlarged ‘‘Player Game Boards’’

without answers (see reproducibles). Lettered discs (circles

made out of card stock, or some sort of plastic round disc that

you can write on) for the message HERE I AM (or another

selected short message) should be made. Furthermore, the

master board (and possibly the student boards as well) may

be covered with a plastic lamination or clear self-stick vinyl

so that it can be written on with water-soluble marking pens

or grease pencils and then erased later.



189



How To Do It:

1. Before play begins, put a hidden message on the round discs, one

letter on each disc. The hidden message is HERE I AM in the

Example below. Then tell the players what the hidden message

will be and place the lettered discs on the Master Game Board,

being careful to keep their locations secret from the players. For

example, on the Master Game Board, the H is placed on the 21,

the E is placed on the 18, and so on. The discs may be placed

in horizontal, vertical, or diagonal fashion, but the letters of each

word must be in adjacent spaces and there may be only one space

between words. One method to keep it hidden is to put an open

book on end in front of the Master Game Board.

2. The game begins when one player calls out a pair of multiplication

factors and suggests an answer. If the group agrees that the stated

answer is correct, each player writes it on his or her own Player

Game Board in the proper position (for example, if the player notes

that 7 × 3 = 21, the answer must be written in the location 7 over

and 3 up, or +7 along the x-axis and +3 on the y-axis). Further, if

the answer matches a lettered space on the Master Game Board,

state whether the answer is correct or not and then say ‘‘Here I

am,’’ and all players mark that location.

3. The game continues with players, in turn, calling new pairs of

factors and answers, and recording the products in the proper

locations on their grids. At any turn, if a player ‘‘hits’’ a lettered location, say ‘‘Here I am.’’ When one or more players think

they know the location of all the HERE I AM discs (or those for

another specified message), they may ask to be ‘‘checked’’; at this

point they must call out all of the multiplication fact problems and

answers that correctly indicate the disc locations. Any player to

properly do so is a winner!



Example:

The leader hid the HERE I AM discs as shown on the Master Game

Board here. When the first player called out the fact that 7 × 7 = 49,

the leader said, ‘‘Correct’’ (but not ‘‘Here I am,’’ because there is no

letter from the clue at that location), so all the players wrote the answer

on their own game boards. The second player stated that 3 × 4 = 12,

and the leader said, ‘‘Correct, and Here I am!’’ All the players then

wrote the product 12 on their game boards and marked that location

with an X to indicate that they had found one of the message letters.



190



Computation Connections



Subsequent players called 4 × 4 = 16, 7 × 3 = 21, and 3 × 3 = 9, and

each time the leader responded, ‘‘Correct.’’ Because the game is not

finished, it will continue until the players place Xs in locations where

seven of their answers match the message letters, and one or more

players have been able to identify the answers to the multiplication fact

problems and the correct letter locations. Any player to do so will be

a winner!

10 10



20



30



40



50



60



70



80



90 100



10



9



9



18



27



36



45



54



63



72



81



90



9



8



8



16



24



32



40



48



56



64



72



80



8



7



7



14



H



28



35



42



49



56



63



70



7



6



6



12



E



24



30



36



42



48



54



60



6



5



5



10



R



20



25



30



35



40



45



50



5



4



4



8



E



16



I



24



28



32



36



40



4



12



3



3



6



9



12



15



18



21



24



27



30



3



9



2



2



4



6



8



10



12



A



16



18



20



2



1



1



2



3



4



5



6



7



M



9



10



1



×



1



2



3



4



5



6



7



8



9



10



×



Master Game Board (kept hidden)



49



1



2



3



16

21



4



5



6



7



8



9



10



Player Game Board



Extensions:

1. At the outset, it is a good idea to use a large Player Game Board

(on the chalkboard or overhead projector) to record the players’

answers. This will reinforce correct multiplication products and

also help clarify the written placement of the answers. (Note: The

players are also informally learning about coordinate geometry.)

2. Change HERE I AM to some other short message. If, for example,

it is Dan’s birthday, the message might be DAY FOR DAN. In

another instance, the players might be told that they will spell the

name of the smallest state (RHODE ISLAND).

3. Students can logically analyze possible answer locations. In the

Example shown above, a hit was made at 3 × 4 = 12, but not at

4 × 4 or 3 × 3. Discuss with students what other locations might

possibly contain a HERE I AM letter, given that, as noted above,

words can be placed horizontally, vertically, or diagonally, and

that there will be a single empty space between words.



Here I Am



191



10 10



20



30



40



50



60



70



80



90 100



9



9



18



27



36



45



54



63



72



81



90



8



8



16



24



32



40



48



56



64



72



80



7



7



14



21



28



35



42



49



56



63



70



6



6



12



18



24



30



36



42



48



54



60



5



5



10



15



20



25



30



35



40



45



50



4



4



8



12



16



20



24



28



32



36



40



3



3



6



9



12



15



18



21



24



27



30



2



2



4



6



8



10



12



14



16



18



20



1



1



2



3



4



5



6



7



8



9



10



ì



1



2



3



4



5



6



7



8



9



10



192



Computation Connections



Copyright â 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



Master Game Board



Player Game Boards

10



10



9



9



8



8



7



7



6



6



5



5



4



4



3



3



2



2



1



1



Copyright © 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



×



1



2



3



4



5



6



7



8



9



10



×



10



10



9



9



8



8



7



7



6



6



5



5



4



4



3



3



2



2



1



1



×



1



2



3



Here I Am



4



5



6



7



8



9



10



×



1



2



3



4



5



6



7



8



9



10



1



2



3



4



5



6



7



8



9



10



193



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