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Appendix C. The Bartle Quotient Survey Questions and Some Results

Appendix C. The Bartle Quotient Survey Questions and Some Results

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The Bartle Test

Keep in mind

1.



that the questions below should be answered in the context of how you play your character on MUDs.



What's more important in a MUD to you?

The number of people



The number of areas to explore



2.



What's more important to you?

The quality of role-playing in a MUD



The uniqueness of the features and game mechanics



3.



When playing a video game, is it more fun to:

Have the highest score on the list?



Beat your best friend one-on-one?



4.



Which do you enjoy more in MUD quests?

Getting involved in the storyline



Getting the rewards at the end



5.



Are you more comfortable as a player on a MUD:

Talking with friends in a tavern?



Out hunting orcs by yourself for experience?



6.



Would you rather:

Defeat an



enemy?



Explore a new area?

7.

On a MUD, a new area opens up. Which do you look forward to more?

Being the first to get the new equipment from the area



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Exploring the new area and finding out its history



8.



What's worse?

To be without friends



To be without power



9.



Which would you enjoy more as a MUD player?

Running your own tavern



Making your own maps of the world and then selling them



10. Someone has PKed you. Do you want to:

Find out why and try to convince that person not to do it again?



Plot your revenge?



11. Would you rather:

Know where to find things?



Know how to get things?



12. On a MUD, would you rather be known for:

Knowledge?



Power?



13. Would you rather win:

A trivia



contest?



An arena battle?



14. Which would you rather be noticed for on a MUD?

Your personality



Your equipment

15.

Would you rather:

Convince your enemies to work for you, not against you?



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Vanquish your enemies?



16. You're a player on a MUD about to go into an unknown dungeon. You have your choice of adding one more person

to your party. Do you bring:

A bard who's a good friend of yours and who's great at entertaining you and your friends?



A wizard to identify the items that you find there?



17. On a MUD, would you rather be known as:

Someone who can run from any two points in the world, and really knows his/her way around?



The person with the best, most unique equipment in the game?



18. On a MUD, would you rather:

Be the most feared



person in the game?



Have a sword twice as powerful as any other in the game?



19. On a MUD, would you rather join a clan of:

Assassins?



Scholars?



20. You meet a new player. Do you think of him/her as:

Potential prey?



Someone who can appreciate your knowledge of the game?



21. Would you rather:

Show someone the sharp blade of your axe?



Hear what someone has to say?



22. Would you rather have:

A spell to damage other players?



A spell that increases the rate at which you gain experience points?

23.

23. You are being chased by a monster on a MUD. Do you:

Ask a friend for help in killing it?



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Hide somewhere you know the monster won't follow?



24. Would you rather be:

Wealthy?



Popular?



25. Which would you enjoy more?

Getting accepted by a



clan



Winning a duel with another player



26. Would you rather receive as a quest reward:

Experience points?



A wand with three charges of a spell that lets you control other players against their will (become a

charm person)?

27. Which is more enjoyable to you?

Killing a big monster



Bragging about it to your friends



28. On a MUD, would you be more prone to brag about:

How many other players you've killed?



Your equipment?



29. Do you tend to:

Have items no one else does?



Know things no one else does?



30. Would you rather:

Become a hero faster than your friends?



Know more secrets than



[ Team LiB ]



your friends?



.



[ Team LiB ]



Bartle Survey Results for Five Leading Games

The tables in this appendix are the Bartle Quotient Survey results for five of the top for-pay PWs. The results were captured on March 4,

2002 at 2:28 p.m. EST.



EverQuest

There are 3,568



people who have selected EverQuest as one of the MUDs they're playing.



The popularity of the combinations is shown in Table C.1.



Table C.1. EQ Player Survey



Results



Ultima Online

There are 1,861 people who have selected Ultima Online as one of the MUDs they're playing.

The popularity of the combinations is shown in Table C.2.



Table C.2. UO Player Survey Results



Asheron's Call

There are 1,065 people who have selected Asheron's Call as one of the MUDs they're playing.

The popularity of the combinations is shown in Table C.3.



Table C.3. AC Player Survey Results



Dark Age of Camelot

There are 998 people who have selected Dark Age of Camelot as one of the MUDs they're playing.

The popularity of the combinations is shown in Table C.4.



Table C.4. Dark Age of Camelot Player Survey Results



Anarchy Online

There are 811 people who have selectedAnarchy Online as one of the MUDs they're playing.

The popularity of the combinations is shown in Table C.5.



Table C.5. AO Player Survey Results



[ Team LiB ]



[ Team LiB ]



Appendix D. Hearts, Clubs, Diamonds, Spades:

Players Who Suit MUDs

by Richard Bartle (richard@mud.co.uk)



[1]



, MUSE Ltd, Colchester, Essex, United Kingdom



[1]



This paper is an April 1996 extension of an earlier article, "Who Plays MUDs" Bartle,

(

1990a). As a result of this, and of the fact that I am not a trained psychologist, do not expect

a conventionally rigorous approach to the subject matter.



Permission to redistribute freely for academic purposes is granted provided that no material changes are made to the text.

Used by permission of Dr. Bartle and The Journal of Virtual Environments (www.brandeis.edu/pubs/jove/).



[ Team LiB ]



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2002 Introduction to the Article by Dr. Bartle

People ought to think about virtual world design.

Well, yes, of course—isn't that obvious? You can't simply sit right down and program, as with regular computer games; to do the job

properly, you need a 600-page design document that took a team of people four months to write. How are the designers going to

produce one of those if they don't think about it?

Well, by thinking about virtual worlds as if they were computer games. They are not. They are places. Furthermore, they are places

inhabited by real, live people.

Traditional computer game design concentrates primarily on technical and gameplay issues; rarely are the people who are going to play

the game taken into account. Yes, there are exceptions: Some games aim at a particular demographic (other than the default—computer

game designers); some games are tailored to change the gaming experience the more expert a player becomes. Basically, though, the

aim is to persuade people to buy the game. What happens after they've bought it isn't really important.

With virtual worlds, it's not so simple. Different types of people will play the game; indeed, for a game to be healthy and keep on growing,

a mix of playing styles is essential. They are ongoing products. They are only virtual WORLDS because of interactions between

disparate players. If everyone is there for the same experience, it's not a world; it's a game or a chat-line or something else.

Programmers make the environment; people make it a world.

Nowadays, designers of virtual worlds routinely look at the kinds of players they expect (or hope) to attract and what those players will

do. Will they spend most of their time battling monsters? Perhaps they'll manufacture goods and form trade networks to sell them?

Maybe they simply like exploring, experiencing the sheer wonder of the world, seeking for it to amaze them at every turn? Or could they

devote their time to politics, implementing changes that will tangibly affect all other players? So many people, so much variety!

It wasn't always this way.

When I wrote "Hearts, Clubs, Diamonds, Spades," few designers of virtual worlds gave any thought to how the people who inhabited

them would act; those that did chose not to articulate their thoughts in public. As I saw more and more virtual worlds appearing and

continual bickering between the proponents of "social" and "game-like" MUDs, it occurred to me that much of what was wrong was that

many people lacked a basic understanding of why things in their favorite kind of virtual world were the way that they were. Design was by

evolution: Take a working model, change it in some way, and see if the new model is better. The changes weren't entirely blind—the

designers had reasons for making them—but, crucially, the effects of earlier designers' decisions were in general a mystery. Why do

most virtual worlds organize players by levels, classes, races, and skills? Because the virtual world their designers cut their teeth on did!

My purpose in writing "Hearts, Clubs, Diamonds, Spades" was to make people think about virtual world design. I felt (and still feel) that

the observations I was making were essentially sound, but it wouldn't have bothered me if they had been disproved within months; the

central point of my article wasn't "this is how people in virtual worlds interact," but "think how people in virtual worlds interact!"

When I wrote it, almost all virtual worlds were text-based MUDs. There were, and remain, several thousand of these in existence, some

of which have been running for years. (And by "years," I mean more than 15—how many regular computer games last that long?)

Today, however, we also have the large-scale graphical MUDs that Jessica and Bridgette have described in detail elsewhere in this

book, which are variously known as "massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs)," "persistent worlds (PWs)," and (as

I've been calling them here) "virtual worlds." Do the points I raised in my mid-1990s article still hold true?

In essence, yes, they do.

The dynamics do change when there are several thousand people in a virtual world instead of several hundred at most. In particular,

players who like to pick on other players can cluster in sufficient numbers that they can hunt in packs, which makes it harder for them to

be controlled by guru-types who know all the answers but are individualistic. However, the basic relationships are still true: If you have a

virtual world with far more socializers than achievers or far more achievers than socializers, you'd better have a host of newbies

constantly adding to the pool or you're going to end up with a lump of die-hards and no one else.



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