Tải bản đầy đủ - 0 (trang)
9What to do when there’s an expert in the audience

9What to do when there’s an expert in the audience

Tải bản đầy đủ - 0trang

The engaging presenter Part III:

How to handle questions and interjections



Making the method powerful



Let’s sum up. As I see it, we have two schools of thought. Most of us

want the extension funded by cutting the HR budget, but Eru and Kate,

you’d rather see it come out of Research and Development (pause, look

around for confirmation) Okay, thank you all. Next item…

Time to call a halt. Obviously we’re not unanimous, but the majority

view seems to be that we go ahead with the project, subject to review

every month (pause, look around for confirmation). Thank you all for

your contributions. We’ll close there.



2.9



What to do when there’s an expert in the audience

Take pleasure in acknowledging expertise.

Don’t fear the experts, take advantage of them.



Your credibility will rise when people see that you’re relaxed about experts contributing. Even more so

when they see that you’re relaxed about experts exposing a weakness in your knowledge. You can be

genuinely grateful for such information coming forth because you’re there to serve the audience. Does

that seem impossibly altruistic? But – as long as you’re not embarrassed – it’s impressive to any audience.

And it’s the only realistic way to handle it.

Sometimes it’s worth acknowledging the presence of an expert before you begin.

“Before I begin, I want to give a special welcome to Martha Lutyens.

Most of you will know that Martha has a great deal of expertise in

the disastrous effects of an accelerated day-night cycle on chickens.

Martha, if I can’t answer a question, could I lay it in front of you?”

(Yes, that was intentional. I couldn’t resist it.)

I know, I haven’t answered a significant worry. If I openly acknowledge the expert, I will seem ignorant

and very soon everyone will want to hear from them and not me. And I don’t have an answer, because it

is possible. However, any expert crass enough to actually take over will earn themselves disrespect from

the audience.



39

Download free eBooks at bookboon.com



The engaging presenter Part III:

How to handle questions and interjections



Making the method powerful



Correcting the self-talk

Here’s an example of the self-conscious, self-defeating, self-talk that costs dearly if we let it take hold.

“Excuse me. I disagree that Lady Margot was rude to Jean Harlowe…”

Oh no, an expert. She’ll know more than me.

“…It wasn’t rudeness, it was withering contempt. When Jean Harlowe

said, ‘It’s a pleasure to meet you Lady Margot’, she pronounced it with a

‘t’ and Lady Margot’s reply was ‘No my dear, it’s Margot. The ‘t’ is silent

as in Harlowe.’”

The audience laughs.

“Uh…” What a disaster. She’s probably knows the hour and the day that

Harlowe and Margot sneezed. They’ll all think this woman should be

up here instead of me. They’ll think I’m a pretender. They’ll think I’m a

charlatan. “Uh… good point… Well, returning to the subject at hand…”

Such disasters are not made by what is thrown at us, but by the way we choose to respond. Yes, it is a

choice – and we could avoid the disasters by choosing to focus on what the audience needs. Let’s correct

that self-defeating self-talk.

“Excuse me. I disagree that Lady Margot was rude to Jean Harlowe.”

“Of course. Go ahead.” Maybe she can add a useful perspective.

“It wasn’t rudeness, it was withering contempt. When Jean Harlowe

said, ‘It’s a pleasure to meet you Lady Margot’, she pronounced it with a

‘t’ and Lady Margot’s reply was ‘No my dear, it’s Margot. The ‘t’ is silent

as in Harlowe.’”

The audience laughs and you laugh with them. Great. A gift for the

audience. “Thank you, I stand corrected. All right… Let’s go on to

Margot’s last years…”



40

Download free eBooks at bookboon.com



The engaging presenter Part III:

How to handle questions and interjections



Making the method powerful



Look back at that self-talk. The most important word was perspective. The audience did not come to hear

facts about Lady Margot. They came to hear your perspective on Lady Margot. The difference means

that it doesn’t matter a jot if the expert is a walking Wikipedia. You’re not there to deliver facts. You’re

there to deliver your perspective on the facts.

When the expert says you’re wrong, you realise you are wrong, and it’s something basic you should have

known

Without doubt, it’s the big one, most feared by young people with senior executives in the audience. And

yet the answer is wondrously simple.

Choose to show your surprise, be completely relaxed,

and say (with genuine gratitude), “I didn’t know that and I

should have. I’ll look it up right after this session. Thank you.“



If your lapse was big enough to affect the rest of your content, openly change the direction of your

presentation without embarrassment – you’re there to look after the audience.

Unrealistic? Easy to say and hard to do?



Challenge the way we run



EXPERIENCE THE POWER OF

FULL ENGAGEMENT…

RUN FASTER.

RUN LONGER..

RUN EASIER…



READ MORE & PRE-ORDER TODAY

WWW.GAITEYE.COM



1349906_A6_4+0.indd 1



22-08-2014 12:56:57



41

Download free eBooks at bookboon.com



Click on the ad to read more



The engaging presenter Part III:

How to handle questions and interjections



Making the method powerful



What choice do you have? You’ve made a significant error. You can’t hide that fact. Are you going to

show the audience that your mistake is a disaster? Or are you going to show them that you are bigger

than one mistake?

Get that right and you’ll impress them.



2.10



When you don’t know the answer



Once again, it’s not rocket science. You just have to do this without embarrassment:

When you don’t know,

say lightly or cheerfully “I don’t know“.



It really is as simple as that, though it might need a follow-up. You could check with the audience. “I

don’t know, can anyone answer that one?” But if no-one knows, undertake to find out.

If it’s a fact that you really should have known, be easy and open about it. “I don’t know… and I should.

Anyone know? Okay, I’ll find out.”



2.11



When the farewelled one bites back



You’re farewelling a staff member and he or she seizes on the opportunity to criticize the company. It’s

commonplace when staff are made redundant. In the following example, accepting feelings is by far the

most important component. And remember that accepting feelings does not imply acceptance of the

facts being offered.



42

Download free eBooks at bookboon.com



Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

9What to do when there’s an expert in the audience

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay(0 tr)

×