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9 Palladium(III) and Platinum(III) Compounds

9 Palladium(III) and Platinum(III) Compounds

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Chemistry of Precious Metals

Dr S.A. COTTON

Uppingham School

Rutland

UK



BLACKIE ACADEMIC & PROFESSIONAL

An Imprint of Chapman & Hall



London • Weinheim • New York • Tokyo • Melbourne • Madras



Published by Blackie Academic and Professional,

an imprint of Chapman & Hall, 2-6 Boundary Row, London SEl 8HN, UK

Chapman & Hall, 2-6 Boundary Row, London SEl 8HN, UK

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First edition 1997

© 1997 Chapman & Hall

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Printed in Great Britain by T. J. International Ltd.

ISBN O 7514 0413 6

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Preface



Some 20 years ago, I was privileged to share in writing a book on the

descriptive chemistry of the 4d, 5d, 4f and 5f metals that included these

eight elements within its compass (S.A. Cotton and F.A. Hart, The Heavy

Transition Elements, Macmillan, 1975). This volume shares the same aim

of covering the descriptive chemistry of silver, gold and the six platinum

metals in some detail at a level suitable for advanced undergraduate and

postgraduate study.

It does not attempt to be a comprehensive treatise on the chemistry of these

metals. It attempts to fill a slot between the general text and the in-depth review

or monograph. The organometallic chemistry is confined to cr-bonded compounds in normal oxidation states; compounds with 7r-bonding ligands are

generally excluded. Their inclusion would have increased the length of the

book considerably and, moreover, their recent chemistry has been extensively

and expertly reviewed in the new Comprehensive Organometallic Chemistry, //,

eds G. Wilkinson, F.G.A. Stone and E.W. Abel, Pergamon, Oxford, 1995.

I have concentrated upon providing information on 'essential' binary

compounds and complexes of these elements - oxides, halides, aqua

complexes, ammines and tertiary phosphine complexes, for example - and

highlighting key areas of study rather than giving comprehensive coverage

(impossible outside a monograph). It is easy to be seduced by the 'latest

thing' in research to the detriment of more fundamental, if prosaic, topics

(in any case, there are other texts that provide up to the moment coverage

of all research developments). There is still a lot of basic research waiting

to be done out there and we have all heard the horror stories of students

who can produce ab initio MO calculations at the drop of a hat yet think

that sodium chloride is a green gas. The data are intended to illustrate

trends in the chemistry and not to replace it; theories explain facts and not

vice versa. I make no apology for this approach; a sound factual understanding is fundamental to any scientific discipline.

My first priority has, therefore, been to try to provide 'the facts' (and I

hope that I have got (most of) them right) but I have tried to write the

book with the needs of the teacher in mind, by providing plenty of bond

lengths and also spectroscopic data (mainly vibrational, with a little NMR

and ESR) that can be used as a teaching tool by hard-pressed lecturers or

tutors who have not time to look up the information themselves.

The bibliography is intended to give key references (particularly to structures), not just to the recent literature (which can be hard to find because they



are not yet in compilations) but in some cases to relevant older work (which

can also be hard to find because everyone assumes that you know them); it

begins for each chapter with a listing of the relevant sections of Gmelin

and of the various 'Comprehensive Chemistries' and monographs. I have

attempted to follow the literature received up to March 1996.

Some readers may feel that I have been unduly optimistic (or just plain

presumptuous) in writing this book, when I am not actually carrying out

research on any of these metals. They may well be right, though I would

point out that the spectator does get a different view of events on the

sports fields to that obtained by the player.

Producing a book like this is impossible without access to the primary

literature, for which I am mainly indebted to the Chemistry Department of

the University of Cambridge, and to Mrs Cheryl Cook in particular.

Much of the background reading, especially for osmium and gold, as well

as work on the bibliography was done in the course of visits to PAbbaye N-D

du Bec-Hellouin; it is again a pleasure to give thanks to Dom Philibert Zobel

O.S.B., Abbot of Bee, and to the monastic community for the shelter of their

roof and a calm and sympathetic environment.

I should like to take the opportunity to thank all those who have supplied

information, answered questions or discussed points with me, including the

late Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson; Professors S. Ahrland, K.G. Caulton, F.A.

Cotton, W.P. Griffith, D.M.P. Mingos, J.D. Woollins and R.K. Pomeroy;

and Drs AJ. Blake, P.R. Raithby, S.D. Robinson and P. Thornton. They

are not, of course, responsible for the use I have made of the information.

I am particularly grateful to Dr John Burgess for reading the whole manuscript in (a very rough) draft and making many helpful suggestions for

improvement, some of which I have been wise enough to adopt. John has

also been an invaluable sounding board for ideas. I must also thank three

(anonymous) reviewers for drawing my attention to a number of omissions,

mistakes and ambiguities, which I hope have now been resolved.

I should finally like to thank Patricia Morrison for her encouragement in

the earlier part of the project and Louise Crawford for patient, sympathetic

and accurate typing.

Simon Cotton

Uppingham

December 1996



Abbreviations



acac

acetylacetonate, CH3COCHCOCH3

Ar

aryl

bipy

bipyridyl (usually 2,2/-bipyridyl)

n

Bu or Bu

H-butyl, CH3CH2CH2CH2

Bu1

f-butyl, (CH3)3C

bz

benzyl

cod

cycloocta-1,5-diene

cy

cyclohexyl, CyCIo-C6H11

cyclam

1,4,8,11 -tetraazaacyclotetracane

depe

bis(diethylphosphino)ethane

diars

o-phenylenebis(dimethylarsine), C6H4 (AsMe2)2

dien

diethylenetriamine, HN[(CH2)2NH2)]2

dimphen

2,9-dimethylphenanthroline

dme

1,2-dimethoxyethane, glyme

DMF

TV^TV-dimethylformamide

dmg

dimethylglyoximate

dmpe

bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane

DMSO

dimethylsulphoxide, Me2SO

dppe

1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane, Ph2(CH2)2Ph2

dppm

l,2-bis(diphenylphophino)methane, Ph2(CH2)Ph2

dppp

l,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane, Ph2(CH2J3Ph2

dppz

bis(diphenylphospino)benzene

EDTA

ethylenediamine tetracetate (4-)

en

1,2-diaminoethane, ethylenediamine

equ

2-ethyl-8-quinolinate

Et

ethyl

Et4dien

N,N,N(N'-tetraethyldiethylenetriamine, HN[(CH2)2NEt2]2

im

imidazole

M-CPBA ra-chloroperoxybenzoic acid

Me

methyl

mes

mesityl, 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl

MNTS

TV-methyl-TV-nitrosotoluene sulphonamide

ncs

7V-chlorosuccinamide

np

naphthyl

OEP

octaethylporphyrin

Ph

phenyl

phen

1,10-phenanthroline



PP

Pr

Pr1

PY

Py2CH2

pz

tacn

terpy

thf

tht

TMP

tmpp

tmu

TPP

trien

ttcn

tu

9S3

1OS3

14[ane]N4

14S4

18S6



2,11 -bis(diphenylphosphinomethyl)benzo[c]phenanthrene

propyl, CH3CH2CH2

isopropyl, (CH3)2CH

pyridine, C5H5N

dipyridiniomethane, (C5H5N)2CH2

pyrazole

1,4,7-triazacyclononane, [9]aneN3

2,2': 6,2"-terpyridyl

tetrahydrofuran

tetrahydrothiophene

tetramesitylporphyrin

tris(2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)phosphine

tetramethylthiourea

tetraphenylporphyrin

triethylenetetramine, N[(CH 2 ) 2 NH 2 )] 3

1,4,7-trithiacyclononane, 9S3

thiourea, (H2N)2CS

,4,7-trithiacyclononane

,4,7-trithiacyclodecane

,4,8,11-tetraazaacyclotetracane, cyclam

,4,8,11-tetrathiacyclotetradecane

,4,8,11,14,17-hexathiacyclooctadecane



All bond lengths given in angstrom units (1 A = 0.1nm)



Contents



Preface .................................................................................



ix



List of Abbreviations .............................................................



xi



1. Ruthenium and Osmium ...............................................



1



1.1



Introduction .....................................................................



1



1.2



The Elements and Uses ..................................................



1



1.2.1



Extraction ......................................................



2



Halides ............................................................................



2



1.3.1



Ruthenium Halides ........................................



2



1.3.2



Osmium Halides ............................................



4



1.3.3



Oxyhalides ....................................................



6



1.3.4



Halide Complexes .........................................



9



1.3.5



'Ruthenium Blues' ..........................................



16



1.3.6



Oxyhalide Complexes ....................................



17



Oxides and Related Anions .............................................



18



1.4.1



Anions ...........................................................



20



1.5



Other Binary Compounds ................................................



21



1.6



Aqua Ions ........................................................................



21



1.7



Compounds of Ruthenium(0) ..........................................



22



1.8



Compounds of Ruthenium(II) And (III) ............................



22



1.8.1



Ammine Complexes ......................................



22



1.8.2



Tertiary Phosphine Complexes ......................



29



1.8.3



Carboxylate Complexes .................................



36



1.3



1.4



This page has been reformatted by Knovel to provide easier navigation.



v



vi



Contents

1.8.4



Sulphide and Sulphoxide Complexes .............



39



1.8.5



Nitrosyl Complexes ........................................



43



1.8.6



Porphyrin Complexes ....................................



48



1.8.7



EDTA Complexes ..........................................



50



1.8.8



Other Complexes of Ruthenium .....................



52



Complexes of Ruthenium(IV) ..........................................



53



1.10 Complexes of Osmium(0) ...............................................



54



1.11 Osmium Complexes in Oxidation States (II-IV) ...............



54



1.11.1 Ammine Complexes ......................................



54



1.11.2 Tertiary Phosphine Complexes ......................



57



1.11.3 Carboxylate Complexes .................................



66



1.11.4 Nitrosyl Complexes ........................................



66



1.11.5 Other Osmium Complexes .............................



68



1.12 Compounds in High Oxidation States .............................



68



1.9



2+



Groups ...................



69



1.12.2 Nitride Complexes .........................................



72



1.12.3 Imides ...........................................................



74



1.13 Simple Alkyls and Aryls ...................................................



75



2. Rhodium and Iridium ....................................................



78



1.12.1 Compounds of the MO2



2.1



Introduction .....................................................................



78



2.2



The Elements and Uses ..................................................



78



2.2.1



Extraction ......................................................



79



Halides and Halide Complexes .......................................



79



2.3.1



Rhodium Halides ...........................................



79



2.3.2



Iridium Halides ..............................................



80



2.3.3



Halometallates ..............................................



81



2.4



Oxides, Hydrides and Other Binary Compounds ............



85



2.5



Aqua Ions and Simple Salts ............................................



87



2.3



This page has been reformatted by Knovel to provide easier navigation.



Contents



vii



2.6



Compounds of Rhodium(0) .............................................



88



2.7



Compounds of Rhodium(I) ..............................................



88



2.7.1



Tertiary Phosphine Complexes ......................



89



2.7.2



Carbonyl Complexes .....................................



98



2.7.3



Alkene Complexes ......................................... 104



2.7.4



Isocyanide Complexes ................................... 105



2.8



2.9



Rhodium(II) Complexes .................................................. 106

2.8.1



Phosphine Complexes ................................... 106



2.8.2



Dimers .......................................................... 107



2.8.3



Other Complexes .......................................... 114



Rhodium(III) Complexes ................................................. 115

2.9.1



Complexes of O-Donors ................................ 115



2.9.2



Complexes of Ammines ................................. 116



2.9.3



Complexes of Other N-Donors ....................... 121



2.9.4



Complexes of S-Donors ................................. 123



2.9.5



Tertiary Phosphine Complexes ...................... 125



2.10 Iridium (I) Complexes ...................................................... 132

2.10.1 Tertiary Phosphine Complexes ...................... 132

2.10.2 Vaska's Compound ........................................ 135

2.11 Dioxygen Complexes ...................................................... 142

2.12 Iridium(II) Complexes ...................................................... 145

2.13 Iridium(III) Complexes ..................................................... 145

2.13.1 Complexes of Ammines ................................. 146

2.13.2 Complexes of S-Donors ................................. 147

2.13.3 Tertiary Phosphine and Arsine

Complexes .................................................... 148

2.13.4 Hydride Complexes ....................................... 149

2.13.5 Case Study of Dimethylphenylphosphine

Complexes .................................................... 152

This page has been reformatted by Knovel to provide easier navigation.



viii



Contents

2.14 Iridium(IV) Complexes ..................................................... 158

2.15 Iridium(V) Complexes ...................................................... 161

2.16 Nitrosyls of Iridium and Rhodium .................................... 163

2.17 Simple Alkyls and Aryls of Iridium and Rhodium ............. 170



3. Palladium and Platinum ................................................ 173

3.1



Introduction ..................................................................... 173



3.2



The Elements and Uses .................................................. 173

3.2.1



3.3



Extraction ...................................................... 174



Halides ............................................................................ 175

3.3.1



Palladium Halides .......................................... 175



3.3.2



Platinum Halides ........................................... 177



3.3.3



Halide Complexes ......................................... 180



3.4



Other Binary Complexes ................................................. 185



3.5



Aqua Ions ........................................................................ 187



3.6



Palladium(0) and Platinum(0) Compounds ..................... 188



3.7



3.8



3.6.1



Tertiary Phosphine Complexes ...................... 188



3.6.2



Reactions of Pt(PPh3)n and Related

Species ......................................................... 192



3.6.3



Carbonyl Complexes ..................................... 195



3.6.4



Carbonyl Clusters .......................................... 196



3.6.5



Isocyanide Complexes ................................... 197



Palladium(I) and Platinum(I) Compounds ....................... 197

3.7.1



Phosphine Complexes ................................... 197



3.7.2



Isocyanide Complexes ................................... 198



Complexes of Palladium(II) and Platinum(II) ................... 199

3.8.1



Complexes of O-Donors ................................ 199



3.8.2



Complexes of N-Donors ................................ 201



3.8.3



Tertiary Phosphine Complexes ...................... 209



This page has been reformatted by Knovel to provide easier navigation.



Contents



ix



3.8.4



Complexes of C-Donors ................................ 219



3.8.5



Complexes of S-Donors ................................. 225



3.8.6



Complexes of Ambidentate Ligands ............... 228



3.8.7



Stability of cis- and trans-Isomers .................. 233



3.8.8



Five-Coordinate Compounds ......................... 235



3.8.9



The trans-Effect ............................................. 236



3.8.10 Structural Evidence for trans-Influence .......... 242

3.8.11 Spectroscopic Evidence for transInfluence ....................................................... 245

3.9



Palladium(III) and Platinum(III) ........................................ 248



3.10 Complexes of Platinum(IV) ............................................. 250

3.10.1 Complexes of N-Donors ................................ 250

3.10.2 Tertiary Phosphine Complexes ...................... 254

3.10.3 Complexes of S-Donors ................................. 256

3.10.4 Application of the trans-Effect to

Synthesis of Platinum(IV) Complexes ............ 256

3.10.5 The trans-Influence in Some Platinum(IV)

Compounds ................................................... 258

3.11 Complexes of Palladium(IV) ............................................ 260

3.12 The σ-Bonded Organometallics of Palladium(IV)

and Platinum(IV) ............................................................. 261

3.12.1 Reductive Elimination Reactions .................... 266

3.13 Anti-Tumour Activity of Platinum Complexes .................. 267

3.14 Bond Lengths in Palladium and Platinum

Analogues ....................................................................... 272



4. Silver and Gold .............................................................. 273

4.1



Introduction ..................................................................... 273



4.2



The Elements and Uses .................................................. 274

4.2.1



Extraction ...................................................... 275



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