Tải bản đầy đủ - 0 (trang)
2 Corporate mobility: impacts on work-life balance

2 Corporate mobility: impacts on work-life balance

Tải bản đầy đủ - 0trang




 
 




Fig. 1



Parameters of stresses and strains according to the journey to / from work

(adapted from Vogl et al. 2014)



Business travel

Business travel is a form of corporate mobility for highly qualified employees.

Within this sample, nearly 60% of business travelers had a graduate or university

degree. These jobs are well paid and all of respondents have permanent employment.

About 60% of all respondents make business trips. The majority of them travel on

behalf of their enterprise up to 10 times per year (64%), 23% travel between 11 and 49

times per year and only 10% travel more than 50 times over the course of one year.

Business trips are seen as enrichment but they can also produce stresses and

strains. Trips are stressful for more than one-third of business travelers, and they

are exhausting for 23%. Thus, every fifth respondent wants to decrease the number

of business trips taken. However, on the other hand, nearly 30% enjoy being on the

move and 58% say that being away on business makes work varied and enriches life.

If we look at the regression model in figure 2, we find a negative correlation

between “self-efficacy perception” and the “autonomy of trip scheduling” on the

one hand, and increasing stresses and strains of business trips on the other. To be

in a position to manage the length and the frequency of a trip has more impact on

subjective wellbeing than the length and frequency of the journey itself.

The conditions of work have a strong correlation with the increasing stresses

and strains caused by business trips. The greater the “workload”, or the greater the



72



Katrin Roller



work-related availability, the greater the stresses and strains individuals feel when

taking business trips. Apart from the conditions of the business travel itself, both

working and personal conditions have a strong impact – in a reinforcing or limiting

way – on the increase in stresses and strains caused by business trips.



Autonomy



Workload



Recognition



Work-related

Availability



Personal

conditions



Conditions of the work



Travel time

business trip



Household and

family

management



Stresses and

strains

business trips



Self-efficacy

perception

Frequency

Business trip



Schedule

business trip



Regularity

business trip



Self-government

of trip

scheduling



Support of the

Company



Conditions of business trips



 


 


 
 




   
 


 
 




Fig. 2



Parameters of increasing stresses and strains according to business trips

(adapted from Vogl et al. 2014)



Corporate Mobility: When and Why Does it Become a Burden?



73



Changing Workplaces

Nearly 40% of all respondents have a job which requires changing workplaces. These

employees, particularly those6 in the energy and building sectors, are employed by

one company and perform their work at several different workplaces. Although

they usually do not work at the head office, for most of the year, their workday starts

and ends at their current workplace.

The majority of respondents of this group “changing workplaces” (55%) must

change their workplace more than 20 times per year. At least 24% work in up to

five workplaces over the course of one year. The remaining group of respondents

(21%) changes workplace between six and 20 times per year. These respondents

often stay just for one day (40%) or up to one week (33%) at the same workplace.

Many of the respondents are partly or permanently overnighters (52%) and

often, are not able to plan their assignments more than one day in advance (nearly

30%). In all other cases (70%), upcoming workplaces could be arranged one week

or more in advance.

The model in figure 3 shows that three of four factors related to the conditions

of the changing workplaces have an impact on the increasing stresses and strains

of the employees. Overnight stays and the length of assignments reinforce the

negative effect; the ability to schedule limits these negative effects on employee

wellbeing. The better their assignments can be planned, the lower the stress levels

these employees feel.

Work conditions and personal conditions have a protective effect on the health of

employees. For example the parameters “recognition” and “self-efficacy perception”

reduce the feeling of stresses and strains.



6 This group covers some workers and many employees. For the sake of simplicity, the

chapter use the term “employee” only.



74



Katrin Roller



Autonomy



Workload



Recognition



Work-related

Availability



Personal

conditions



Conditions of the work



Household and

family

management

Self-efficacy

perception



Length

assignments



Stresses

and strains

changing

workplaces



Frequency

assignments



Overnight stay

at other

workplaces



Schedule of the

assignments



Conditions of changing workplaces



 


 


 


Tài liệu bạn tìm kiếm đã sẵn sàng tải về

2 Corporate mobility: impacts on work-life balance

Tải bản đầy đủ ngay(0 tr)

×