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PERSONALITIES 12.2 The “Big Five” Personality Traits

PERSONALITIES 12.2 The “Big Five” Personality Traits

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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Myers-Brigg Type Indicator

• A popular approach to personality assessment

• uses a sophisticated questionnaire to examine how

people act or feel in various situations

• Developed from foundations from psychologist Carl

Jung

• Examines differences in the way people relate with

others

• Examines how people gather information

Examines how people evaluate information

Copyright â2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Myers-Brigg Type Indicator

• Myers-Briggs Four Personality Types

• Extraversion vs. introversion (E or I—whether a person

tends toward being outgoing and sociable or shy and quiet

• Sensing vs. intuitive (S or N)—whether a person tends to

focus on details or on the big picture in dealing with

problems

• Thinking vs. feeling (T or F)—whether a person tends to

rely on logic or emotions in dealing with problems

• Judging vs. perceiving (J or P)—whether a person prefers

order and control or acts with flexibility and spontaneity



 

Copyright ©2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Personality Traits

Sample Myers-Briggs Personality Types

• ESTJ (extraverted, sensing, thinking, judging)—practical,

decisive, logical, and quick to dig in; common among

managers

• ENTJ (extraverted, intuitive, thinking, judging)—analytical,

strategic, forceful, quick to take charge; common for leaders

• ISFJ (introverted, sensing, feeling, judging)—conscientious,

considerate, and helpful; common among team players

• INTJ (introverted, intuitive, thinking, judging)—insightful,

free-thinking, determined; common for visionaries

Copyright ©2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Personalities Vary

• Authoritarianism

• Respect authority

• Machiavellianism

• Manipulate others to achieve goals

• Self monitoring

• Open to feedback

Able to adjust to changing situations



Copyright â2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Personality Traits



Copyright ©2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Type A Personalities Stress Themselves

• Stress

• A state of tension experienced by individuals facing

extraordinary demands, constraints or

opportunities

• Type A personalities

High achievement orientation

Creates own stress



Copyright â2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Stress Has Consequences



• Stress

• Tension when faced with demands, constraints and

opportunities

• Constructive stress

• Destructive stress

• Job burnout

• physical and mental exhaustion from work stress

• A flameout

• occurs when we communicate extreme agitation in

interpersonal relationships or electronic messages

• Workplace rage

aggressive behavior toward co-workers or the work

setting

Copyright â2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Personality Traits

• Locus of Control

• Internal

• Personal control over success and failure

• “If it is to be, it’s up to me!”



• External

• Little personal control

• “What happens, happens.”



Copyright ©2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Stress Has Consequences



Copyright â2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Personal Wellness

Personal Wellness

• pursuit of a personal health-promotion

program



• Helps cope with stress and job demands

• Rest

• Exercise

• Eating right

• Healthy habits

Copyright ©2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2



Study Guide for Takeaway 12.2

Rapid Review:

• The Big Five personality factors are extraversion, agreeableness,

conscientiousness, emotional stability, and openness.

• The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator identifies personality types based on

extraversion-introversion, sensing-intuitive, thinking-feeling, and judgingperceiving.

• Additional personality dimensions of work significance are locus of control,

authoritarianism, Machiavellianism, self-monitoring, and Type A orientation.

• Stress is a state of tension that accompanies extraordinary demands,

constraints, or opportunities.

• For some people, having a Type A personality creates stress as a result of

continual feelings of impatience and pressure.

• Stress can be destructive or constructive; a moderate level of stress can have a

positive impact on performance.

Copyright ©2018 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.



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PERSONALITIES 12.2 The “Big Five” Personality Traits

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