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3 Marketing To People With Disabilities

3 Marketing To People With Disabilities

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with special needs. The program has won awards from the National Business &

Disability Council (www.nbdc.com).

Still, while some 100 companies have aired commercials featuring people with

disabilities, such ads are relatively rare.

The most recent Paralympic Games offered a marketing opportunity for

companies. Official Sponsors and Partners included Adidas, Budweiser, Coca-Cola,

Haier, Johnson & Johnson, McDonald’s, Samsung, UPS, Visa, and Volkswagen.

Disability Matters, an annual conference hosted by Springboard Consulting

(www.consultspringboard.com), brings together marketers that focus on marketing

to people with disabilities. The 2016 Disability Matters conference was held April 19-21

in Durham, North Carolina.



76.4 Market Resources

Open Doors Organization, 8623 W. Bryn Mawr Avenue, Suite 508, Chicago, IL, 60631.

(773) 388-8839. (www.opendoorsnfp.org)

Springboard Consulting, 14 Glenbrook Drive, Mendham, NJ 07945. (973) 813-7260.

(www.consultspringboard.com)



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



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77

FAMILIES WITH CHILDREN



77.1 Profile

According to the U.S. Census Bureau (www.census.gov), the are 34.7 million

families (44%) with children under 18 living at home. At peak, 57% of families had

children under 18 living at home – in 1953.

_________________________________________________________________



“The consequences of the ongoing ‘Baby Bust’

are readily apparent in the 2015 Current

Population Survey. The number of households

with children under age 18 fell by 965,000

between 2014 and 2015 – a substantial 2.4%

decline.”

Demo Memo

_________________________________________________________________



Families And Living Arrangements, by the Census Bureau, reported households

with children by ethnicity/race of householder as follows:

• Hispanic:

43%

• Asian-American:

36%

• African-American:

31%

• Caucasian:

25%

By generation of householder, Families And Living Arrangements reported

households with children under age 18 as follows:

• Millennials:

47%

• Generation X:

56%

• Baby Boomers:

12%

• Older Americans:

1%



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



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By income, the distribution of the nation's 74 million child-dwelling families is as

follows (source: Families And Living Arrangements):

• In a family with an income below $25,000:

21%

• In a family with an income between $25,000 and $49,999:

21%

• In a family with an income between $50,000 and $99,999:

28%

• In a family with an income of $100,000 or more:

30%

The average number of people under age 18 per U.S. household has been as

follows (source: Census Bureau):

• 1964:

1.24

• 1970:

1.09

• 1980:

0.79

• 1990:

0.69

• 2000:

0.69

• 2010:

0.64

• 2015:

0.60

Among families with children under 18 at home, there are 5.0 million stay-athome moms and 154,000 stay-at-home dads.

Analysts estimate that more than 18 million young adults ages 20-to-34 live with

their parents, representing about one-third of that age group.

Some five million American grandparents live with one of their grandchildren,

according to the Census Bureau. Dubbed ‘grandfamilies,’ these households represent

nearly 7% of American families.

For a great number of families now, the economy may be a factor in deciding

family size, including whether to have children at all. The U.S. recorded 4.25 million live

births in 2008 – the first full year of the recession – down about 68,000 from the prior

year and the first annual decline in births since the start of the decade, according to the

National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS, www.cdc.gov/nchs). The number of births

declined further in 2009 to 4.13 million and to 3.95 million in 2012.

For comparison, the following number of U.S. women are projected to remain

child free:

• 1 in 8 with high income

• 1 in 14 with middle income

• 1 in 20 with low income

In 1976, one in 10 women had no children; in 2014 that figure was one in five.



77.2 Working Parents

For most families with children under age 18, all parents in the household are

employed. According to Employment Characteristics of Families, published in 2015 by

the Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov), employment status of parents with

children living at home has been as follows:

CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



• 423 •



Married couple families, both mother and father employed

• Total with children under age 18:

60.2%

• With children ages 6-to-17 only:

70.4%

• With children under age 6:

55.3%

Female-headed single-parent families, mother employed

• Total with children under age 18:

69.4%

• With children ages 6-to-17 only:

74.3%

• With children under age 6:

62.1%

Male-headed single-parent families, father employed

• Total with children under age 18:

81.9%

• With children ages 6-to-17 only:

81.3%

• With children under age 6:

82.7%

_________________________________________________________________



“Among the nation's children under age 15, only

20% live the Leave it to Beaver lifestyle – two

parents, married, and a mother who does not

work because she is caring for the family.”

Demo Memo, 3/6/16

_________________________________________________________________



77.3 Cost Of Raising Children

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (www.usda.gov) has calculated estimates of

expenditures for raising children. According to the most recent report, it will cost an

estimated $304,480 for a middle-income couple to raise a child for 18 years, not

including the cost of college.

Spending is distributed as follows:

• Housing:

30%

• Child care and education:

18%

• Food:

16%

• Transportation:

14%

• Healthcare:

8%

• Clothing:

6%

• Miscellaneous:

8%



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



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Child-rearing expenses vary considerably by household income level. For a child

in a two-child, two-spouse family, annual expenses ranged from $9,130 to $10,400, on

average, (depending on age of the child) for households with before-tax income less

than $61,530, from $12,800 to $14,970 for households with before-tax income between

$61,530 and $106,540, and f rom $21,330 to $25,700 for households with before-tax

income more than $106,540.

On average, households in the lowest income group spend 25% of their beforetax income on a child; those in the middle-income group spend 16%; and those in the

highest group spend 12%.

Compared with expenditures on each child in a two-child, two-spouse family,

expenditures by two-spouse households with one child average 25% more on the single

child. Expenditures by households with three or more children average 22% less on

each child.

Child-rearing expense patterns of single-parent households with a before-tax

income less than $61,530 were 7% lower than those of two-spouse households in the

same income group. Most single-parent households were in this income group

(compared with about one-third of two-spouse families).

Annual expenditures for raising one, two, or three children, by age of the

youngest child, are as follows:

Married Family



Single-Parent Family



One-child Household

• Age 2:

• Age 5:

• Age 8:

• Age 11:

• Age 14:

• Age 17:



$16,180

$16,210

$16,000

$17,110

$18,030

$18,710



$10,440

$11,620

$11,350

$12,150

$12,690

$12,330



Two-child Household*

• Age 2:

• Age 5:

• Age 8:

• Age 11:

• Age 14:

• Age 15:



$27,910

$27,940

$27,770

$28,650

$29,390

$29,940



$17,360

$18,280

$18,070

$18,690

$19,110

$18,830



Three-child Household*

• Age 2:

$33,020

• Age 5:

$33,040

• Age 8:

$32,910

• Age 11:

$33,590

• Age 12:

$34,170



$20,720

$21,430

$21,270

$21,740

$22,070



* Age of older child: 16



* Age of older children: 13, 16



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



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