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1 Satisfaction With Personal Life

1 Satisfaction With Personal Life

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2002:

2003:

2004:

2005:

2006:

2007:

2008:

2009:

2010:

2011:

2012:

2013:

2014:

2015:

2016:



Getting Better



Getting Worse



Same



52%

43%

53%

49%

47%

51%

32%

34%

39%

41%

42%

47%

43%

52%

47%



29%

35%

29%

35%

37%

32%

49%

43%

40%

41%

41%

36%

40%

33%

38%



19%

20%

18%

15%

15%

16%

17%

22%

19%

16%

16%

15%

16%

15%

14%



9.3 Economic Well-Being

Report on the Economic Well-Being of U.S. Households in 2015, published in

May 2016 by the Federal Reserve (www.federalreserve.gov), reported financial wellbeing of U.S. households as follows:

• Sixty-nine percent (69%) of adults report that they are either “living comfortably” or

“doing okay,” compared to 65% in 2014 and 62% in 2013. However, 31%, or

approximately 76 million adults, are either “struggling to get by” or are “just getting

by.”

• Individuals are 9 percentage points more likely to say that their financial well-being

improved during the prior year than to say that their financial well-being declined.

• Twenty-two percent (22%) of employed adults indicate that they are either working

multiple jobs, doing informal work for pay in addition to their main job, or both.

• Twenty-three percent (23%) of respondents expect their income to be higher in the

year after the survey, down from 29% who expected income growth in the year after

the 2014 survey.

• Sixty-eight percent (68%) of non-retired respondents saved at least a portion of their

income in the prior year.

• Thirty-two percent (32%) of adults report that their income varies to some degree

from month to month, and 43% report that their monthly expenses vary to some

degree. Forty-two percent (42%) of those with volatile incomes or expenses say

that they have struggled to pay their bills at times because of this volatility.

• Forty-six percent (46%) of adults say they either could not cover an emergency

expense costing $400, or would cover it by selling something or borrowing money.

• Twenty-two percent (22%) of respondents experienced a major unexpected medical

expense that they had to pay out of pocket in the prior year, and 46% of those who

say they had a major medical expense report that they currently owe debt from that

expense.



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



• 69 •



9.4 Happiness

Since 2008, The Harris Poll (www.theharrispoll.com) has conducted a happiness

poll. The poll ascertains a Happiness Index based on survey responses relating to

various aspects of their lives. The poll was annual prior to 2011 and biennial thereaf ter.

The median Happiness Index among all adults has been as follows:

• 2008:

35

• 2009:

35

• 2010:

33

• 2011:

33

• 2013:

33

• 2015:

34

By demographic, the Happiness Index in 2015 was as follows:

Gender

• Female:

36

• Male:

33

Age

• 18-to-24:

• 25-to-29:

• 30-to-39:

• 40-to-49:

• 50-to-50:

• 65 and older:



32

31

31

30

36

42



Race/Ethnicity

• African American:

• Caucasian:

• Hispanic:



36

34

28



Income

• Less than $35,000:

• $35,000 to $49,999:

• $50,000 to $74,999:

• $75,000 to $99,999:

• $100,000 or more:



30

35

34

35

38



Education:

• High school or less:

• Some college:

• College graduate:

• Post graduate:



34

34

36

37



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



• 70 •



According to a study by economist Angus Deaton, Ph.D., and Nobel Laureate

Daniel Kahneman, Ph.D., at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs, Princeton

University (http://wws.princeton.edu), income increases happiness only for those with

annual incomes below $75,000. The lower a person’s annual income falls below that

benchmark, the unhappier he or she feels. But no matter how much above $75,000

people earn, they don’t report any greater degree of happiness.

Researchers at Brookings Institution (www.brookings.org) have found a

correlation between age and happiness. Happiness in most adults tends to diminish

until age 50 or 55, then increases with age.

_________________________________________________________________



“The true causes of midlife dissatisfaction are

not what you probably think. A growing body of

research shows that they lie deep within our

biology and that we reliably grow happier,

regardless of circumstances, after our 40s have

passed. The peak of emotional life may not

occur until well into the seventh decade.”

Jonathan Rauch, Senior Fellow

Brookings Institution

_________________________________________________________________



9.5 Stress

The American Psychological Association (www.apa.org) has conducted the

Stress In America survey since 2007. Adults participating in the survey have reported

their stress on a scale of 1-to-10 (1 is little or no stress; 10 is a great deal of stress) as

follows:

• 2007:

6.2

• 2008:

5.9

• 2009:

5.4

• 2010:

5.4

• 2011:

5.2

• 2012:

4.9

• 2013:

5.1

• 2014:

4.9

• 2015:

5.1



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



• 71 •



Stress In America 2015, published in March 2016, reported the stress index by

demographic as follows:

Gender

• Female:

5.3

• Male:

4.9

Generation

• Millennials:

• Generation Xers:

• Baby Boomers:

• Seniors:



6.0

5.6

4.3

3.5



Race/Ethnicity

• African-American:

• Asian-American:

• Caucasian:

• Hispanic:



5.2

5.1

5.5

6.0



Community

• Rural:

• Suburban:

• Urban:



4.7

5.0

5.6



9.6 Personal Health

A November 2015 poll conducted by Gallup asked adults how they would

describe their physical health. Responses were as follows:

• Excellent:

29%

• Good:

50%

• Fair:

16%

• Poor:

5%

When asked how they would describe their mental health or emotional wellbeing, responses were as follows:

• Excellent:

43%

• Good:

45%

• Fair:

8%

• Poor:

4%

The National Adult Tobacco Survey, by the Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention (CDC, www.cdc.gov), reports that 21.3% of adults use tobacco.



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



• 72 •



9.7 Weight Control and Dieting

According to the CDC, 27% of adults are obese and an additional 36% are

overweight. Being overweight increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease, cancer,

arthritis, and other health problems.

Rand Corp. (www.rand.org) assessed that 6.6% of U.S. adults are severely

obese, or more than 100 pounds above a healthy weight for their body type.

Healthcare costs for those severely obese are more than double those of the general

adult population.

A November 2015 poll conducted by Gallup asked adults how they would

describe their personal weight situation. Responses were as follows:

• About right:

56%

• Overweight:

37%

• Underweight:

5%

According to Marketdata Enterprises (www.marketdataenterprises.com),

consumers spend $62 billion each year on weight loss and weight control. Spending

includes health club memberships, diet programs, diet drinks, and prepared foods.

Annual spending for diet programs such as Jenny Craig, Nutrisystem, and Weight

Watchers is $3.6 billion.



9.8 Exercise And Fitness

According to the CDC, 49% of adults engage in 30 minutes or more of moderate

physical activity five or more days per week or vigorous physical activity for 20 minutes

or more three or more days per week.

Americans who participate in sports, recreation, or exercise spend an average of

1.7 hours daily doing so – one-third of their leisure time is spent on these activities,

according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov). But the vast majority of

people are not so engaged in physical activities.

According to The American Time Use Survey, published by the Bureau of Labor

Statistics (www.bls.gov), Americans, on average, spend 18 minutes per day

participating in sports, exercise, or recreation. On average, teens are active 40 minutes

a day; people ages 35 and above spend 15 minutes or less being active.

Survey of The American Consumer, by GfK MRI (www.gfkmri.com), reported in

2015 that 41% of adults exercise regularly. This percentage was the same as in the

2002 GfK MRI survey, however the number of adults who exercise at health and fitness

clubs increased to 32% from 23% during that timeframe.

There are approximately 34,460 health and fitness clubs in the U.S., according

to the International Health, Racquet & Sportsclub Association (www.ihrsa.org).

Combined, they have approximately 54.1 million members. First Research

(www.firstresearch.com) estimates 2016 spending for memberships and services at

$25 billion.



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



• 73 •



9.9 Eating

According to the Consumer Expenditure Survey, by the Bureau of Labor

Statistics, American households spend an average of $6,599 annually on food. The

restaurant share of the food dollar is approximately 40.6%.

_________________________________________________________________



“Americans spend more at restaurants than they

think they do. We know this because the

Consumer Expenditure Survey asks respondents

how much they usually spend at restaurants per

week, and it also asks them to keep a daily diary of

their expenditures. The results are not the same.

The more precise diary method consistently shows

restaurant spending to be 16% to 22% greater than

the guesstimate. The opposite happens with

grocery shopping. When asked how much they

usually spend on groceries per week, households

over-report their spending by about 21% in

comparison with diary data on grocery purchases.”

Demo Memo

_________________________________________________________________



Eating Patterns In America, by The NPD Group (www.npd.com), reported that

households are eating at home more, but they are purchasing more prepared meals

and are cooking less. Households eat eight of 10 meals at home.

_________________________________________________________________



“A decline in restaurant usage and an increase

in meals from home is one of the single biggest

changes in eating patterns in Americans in the

last five years.”

Harry Balzer, V.P.

The NPD Group

_________________________________________________________________



CONSUMER BEHAVIOR 2017-2018



• 74 •



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