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10 Measurement, analysis and improvement

10 Measurement, analysis and improvement

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PD 6079-4:2006

Annex A (informative)



Examples of project organization

structures

NOTE The following organization structure diagrams illustrate

graphically the most commonly used organization arrangements in the

construction industry.



A.1



Traditional management structure

Figure A.1 and Figure A.2 show typical lines of authority and

contractual relationships in a traditional management structure.



Figure A.1



Traditional management structures – Lines of authority



Client



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Lead Design Consultant and

Contract Administrator



Design

Consultants



Design

Consultants



Main Contractor



Subcontractors



Figure A.2



Traditional management structure – Contractual relationships



Client



Lead Consultant/

Contract

Administrator



Design

Consultants



Main Contractor



Subcontractors



© BSI 2006 •



67



PD 6079-4:2006

A.2



Design and build management structure

Figure A.3 and Figure A.4 show typical lines of authority and

contractual relationships in a design and build management structure.



Figure A.3



Design and build – Lines of authority

Client



Executive Design

Team



Employer's Agent



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Contractor



Lead Consultant



Works Contractors



Design

Consultants



Figure A.4



Design and build – Contractual relationships

Client



Employer's Agent



Contractor



Executive Design

Team



Lead Consultant



Works Contractors



Design Consultants



68 • © BSI 2006



PD 6079-4:2006

A.3



Management structure for construction

management

Figure A.5 and Figure A.6 show typical lines of authority and

contractual relationships in a management structure for construction

management.



Figure A.5



Construction management – Lines of authority



Client



Construction Manager



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Lead Consultant



Works Contractors



Design

Consultants



Figure A.6



Construction management structure – Contractual relationships



Client



Lead Consultant



Design

Consultants



Construction

Manager



Works Contractors



© BSI 2006 •



69



PD 6079-4:2006

A.4



Turnkey management structure

Figure A.7 and Figure A.8 show typical lines of authority and

contractual relationships in a turnkey management structure.



Figure A.7



Turnkey management structure – Lines of authority



Client



Contractor



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Lead Consultant



Works Contractors



Design

Consultants



Figure A.8



Turnkey management structure – Contractual relationships



Client



Contractor



Lead Consultant



70 • © BSI 2006



Design

Consultants



Works Contractors



PD 6079-4:2006

A.5



Management structure for executive project

management

Figure A.9 and Figure A.10 show typical lines of authority and

contractual relationships in a management structure for executive

project management.



Figure A.9



Executive project management – Lines of authority



Client



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Executive Project Manager



Lead Consultant



Contractor



Design

Consultants



Works

Contractors



Figure A.10



Executive project management – Contractual relationships



Client



Executive Project

Manager



Contractor



Works Contractors

Lead

Consultant



Design

Consultants



© BSI 2006 •



71



PD 6079-4:2006

Annex B (informative)



Project lifecycles

Table B.1 illustrates some of the more common project lifecycles, and

phase names in regular use in building projects.



Table B.1



Examples of project phase descriptions used in the construction

industry



BS 6079-1:2002

project phases



Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)

plan of work



British Property Federation (BPF) stages



1. Conception



A. Inception



Stage 1. Concept



2. Feasibility



B. Feasibility



3. Realization



C. Concept



Stage 2. Preparation of the brief



D. Scheme design



Stage 3. Design development



E. Detail design

F. Production information

G. Bills of quantities

H. Tender action



Stage 4. Tender documentation and tendering



J. Project planning



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K. Operations on site



Stage 5. Construction



L. Completion

M. Evaluation

4. Operation







5. Termination







Annex C (informative)

C.1



Published standards

British Standards

The British Standards Institution publishes standards relating to

management systems, design, products and materials. It sets standards

of best practice for design and construction in the UK, which are used

on projects overseas that are designed and constructed by UK practices

and contractors.



C.2



ISO Standards

The International Standards Organization publishes standards relating

to management systems, design, components and materials. It sets

standards of best practice for design and construction across Europe,

which are used on projects both in the UK and overseas.



C.3



Material and component standards

A number of trade and professional bodies produce standards for

particular materials and components. They also certify materials and

components. The standards generally represent best practice in the

design, manufacture, installation or use of those materials and

components. Certificated materials and components conform to these

standards.



72 • © BSI 2006



PD 6079-4:2006



Bibliography

Standards publications

For dated references, only the edition cited applies. For undated

references, the latest edition of the referenced document (including any

amendments) applies.

BS 7799-3, Information security management systems – Part 3:

Guidelines for information security risk management

BS EN 12973, Value management

BS EN ISO 9000:2005, Quality management systems –

Fundamentals and vocabulary

BS EN ISO 9001, Quality management systems – Requirements

BS EN ISO 9004:2000, Quality management systems – Guidelines

for performance improvements



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BS ISO 10007, Quality management systems – Guidelines for

configuration management



Other publications

[1] GREAT BRITAIN. Construction (Design and Management)

Regulations 1994 and subsequent amendments. London: HMSO.

[2] GREAT BRITAIN. Building Regulations 2000 and subsequent

amendments. London: The Stationery Office.

[3] GREAT BRITAIN. Building Standards (Scotland) Regulations 1990

and subsequent amendments. London: HMSO.

[4] GREAT BRITAIN. Building Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2000.

London: The Stationery Office.

[5] GREAT BRITAIN. Freedom of Information Act 2000. London:

The Stationery Office.

[6] EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES. 98/4/EC. EC Procurement Directives

Directive 98/4/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of

16 February 1998 amending Directive 93/38/EEC coordinating the

procurement procedures of entities operating in the water, energy,

transport and telecommunications sectors. Luxembourg: Office for

Official Publications of the European Communities, 1998.



Further reading and information

BOURN, Sir John, on behalf of the NATIONAL AUDIT OFFICE.

Modernising construction – Report by the Comptroller and Auditor

General, HC 87 Session 2000–2001 (“The Latham Report”). London:

The Stationery Office, 2001.

http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/nao_reports/00-01/000187.pdf

CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF BUILDING. Code of practice for project

management for construction and development. Third edition.

Oxford/Edinburgh: Blackwell Science, 2002. ISBN 1405103094.



© BSI 2006 •



73



PD 6079-4:2006

CONSTRUCTION TASK FORCE TO THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER.

Rethinking Construction (“The Egan Report”). London: Department

of Trade and Industry Construction Sector Unit, 1998.

http://www.dti.gov.uk/construction/rethink/report/



Licensed copy:WESSEX WATER, 11/10/2006, Uncontrolled Copy, © BSI



OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT COMMERCE. Achieving excellence

guides. London: Office of Government Commerce, 2003–2005.

http://www.ogc.gov.uk/sdtoolkit/reference/ogc_library/

achievingexcellence/



74 • © BSI 2006



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blank



PD 6079-4:2006



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