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AS/NZS 2293.1:1998 EMERGENCY EVACUATION LIGHTING FOR BUILDINGS - SYSTEM DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION

AS/NZS 2293.1:1998 EMERGENCY EVACUATION LIGHTING FOR BUILDINGS - SYSTEM DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND OPERATION

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AS/NZS 2293.1:1998
This Joint Australian/New Zealand Standard was prepared by Joint Technical
Committee LG/7, Emergency Lighting in Buildings. It was approved on behalf of
the Council of Standards Australia on 25 February 1998 and on behalf of the
Council of Standards New Zealand on 27 February 1998. It was published on
5 May 1998.

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The following interests are represented on Committee LG/1:
The Association of Consulting Engineers Australia
Australian Building Codes Board
Australian Electrical and Electronic Manufacturers Association
Australian Institute of Building Surveyors
Building Control Commission, Victoria
Building Industry Authority, New Zealand
Department of Public Works and Housing, Queensland
Department of Public Works and Services, New South Wales
Illuminating Engineering Society of Australia and New Zealand
National Electrical Contractors Association of Australia
New South Wales Fire Brigades
New Zealand Electrical Regulatory Authorities
New Zealand Manufacturers Federation
Property Council of Australia
WorkCover New South Wales
WORKS Australia

Review of Standards. To keep abreast of progress in industry, Joint Australian/
New Zealand Standards are subject to periodic review and are kept up to date by the
issue of amendments or new editions as necessary. It is important therefore that
Standards users ensure that they are in possession of the latest edition, and any
amendments thereto.
Full details of all Joint Standards and related publications will be found in the Standards
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supplemented each month by the magazines ‘The Australian Standard’ and ‘Standards
New Zealand’, which subscribing members receive, and which give details of new
publications, new editions and amendments, and of withdrawn Standards.
Suggestions for improvements to Joint Standards, addressed to the head office of either
Standards Australia or Standards New Zealand, are welcomed. Notification of any
inaccuracy or ambiguity found in a Joint Australian/New Zealand Standard should be
made without delay in order that the matter may be investigated and appropriate action
taken.

This Standard was issued in draft form for comment as DR 97362.

AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

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Australian/New Zealand Standard™
Emergency evacuation lighting for
buildings
Part 1: System design, installation
and operation

Originated in Australia as part of AS 2293.1 — 1979.
Final Australian edition AS 2293.1 — 1987.
Originated in New Zealand as part of NZS 6742:1971.
AS 2293.1 — 1987 and NZS 6742:1971 jointly revised,
in part, and designated AS/NZS 2293.1:1995.
Second edition 1998.

Published jointly by:
Standards Australia
1 The Crescent,
Homebush NSW 2140 Australia
Standards New Zealand
Level 10, Radio New Zealand House,
155 The Terrace,
Wellington 6001 New Zealand
ISBN 0 7337 1920 1

AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

2

PREFACE
This Standard was prepared by the Joint Standards Australia/Standards New Zealand
Committee LG/7, Emergency Lighting in Buildings, to supersede AS/NZS 2293.1:1995
Emergency lighting for buildings, Part 1: System design, installation and operation.
The Standard sets out requirements for the design, installation and operation of emergency
evacuation lighting systems for buildings. The objective of these requirements is to ensure
the provision of visual conditions that will alleviate panic and facilitate safe evacuation of
the building occupants should this be necessary in the event of failure of the normal
lighting.
The objective of this edition is to introduce a number of necessary changes, particularly
those sought by the Australian Building Codes Board, with a view to the Standard being
in a form that is suitable for reference in the Building Code of Australia.

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Attention is drawn to the need for emergency evacuation lighting systems to be regularly
maintained. In this regard it should be noted that AS/NZS 2293.2* specifies the periodic
inspection and maintenance checks that should be carried out to ensure that emergency
evacuation lighting systems will continue to function effectively.
For direct lighting systems, two alternative methods are specified for deriving the required
spacings for emergency luminaires, viz.
(a)

A set of rules involving the classification of emergency luminaires according to
their light output distribution (see AS/NZS 2293.3*) coupled with requirements
relating the luminaire mounting height and maximum spacing (see Clauses 5.3.2.2
and 5.3.2.3, and Tables 5.1 to 5.5).

(b)

Calculations of the illuminance at floor level conducted in a specified manner
(see Clause 5.3.2.4).

There are differences in the way in which the methods described in Items (a) and (b) are
specified for separate application in Australia and New Zealand, as explained below.
For Australian purposes, the spacing rules continue to be based on illuminance
calculations in which only the luminous flux that reaches the floor directly from the
emergency luminaires is taken into account.
For New Zealand purposes, similar spacing rules apply to those for use in Australia
except that a separate luminaire classification is calculated for each room or space that is
to be provided with emergency lighting. For illuminance calculations, the luminous flux
that reaches the floor both directly and indirectly (by reflection from room surfaces) is
taken into account.
The above differences arise in part from different regulatory positions in Australia and
New Zealand. In particular, the different requirements arise from the following:
(i)

In New Zealand The underlying basis for the requirements is the provision of an
illuminance of not less than 1 lx at any point, as required by the New Zealand
Building Code. Both the direct and inter-reflected luminous flux components are
taken into account.

(ii)

In Australia The underlying basis for the requirements is the provision of an
illuminance not less than 0.2 lx at the mid-point between adjacent luminaires. Only
the direct component of luminous flux is taken into account.

* AS/NZS
2293

Emergency evacuation lighting for buildings

2293.2

Part 2: Inspection and maintenance

2293.3

Part 3: Emergency luminaires and exit signs

3

AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

The differences between the New Zealand and Australian positions are, in practice, not as
large as they appear. For a number of practical reasons, emergency lighting systems
designed in accordance with the Australian spacing rules (i.e. Tables 5.1 to 5.5) have, by
measurement, been observed to provide illuminances comparable to those required by the
New Zealand Building Code.
Differences also exist with respect to the installation of exit signs. For Australia, the
requirements of Clause 5.6 are similar to those of AS 2293.1 — 1987 but with some
changes. For New Zealand, Clause 5.7 requires compliance with Approved Document F8
of the New Zealand Building Code.
The abovementioned differences will be given further attention in a future revision of the
Standard, having regard to any developments with respect to international
recommendations covering this subject.

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The terms ‘normative’ and ‘informative’ have been used in this Standard to define the
application of the appendix to which they apply. A ‘normative’ appendix is an integral
part of a Standard, whereas an ‘informative’ appendix is only for information and
guidance.

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Care should be taken to ensure that material used is from the current edition of the Standard and that it is updated whenever the Standard
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AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

4

CONTENTS
Page
FOREWORD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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SECTION 1 SCOPE AND GENERAL
1.1 SCOPE AND APPLICATION . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.2 REFERENCED DOCUMENTS . . . . . . . . . . .
1.3 DEFINITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1.4 COMPLIANCE WITH OTHER STANDARDS
1.5 NEW DESIGNS AND INNOVATIONS . . . . .
1.6 ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS . . . . . . .

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SECTION 2 SYSTEM PERFORMANCE, ARRANGEMENT AND CONTROL
2.1 SCOPE OF SECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2 OPERATION OF EMERGENCY LUMINAIRES AND EXIT SIGNS
2.3 DURATION OF OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4 ARRANGEMENT AND CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5 LABELLING OF DEVICES CONTROLLING THE OPERATION OF
EMERGENCY LIGHTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6 COMMISSIONING TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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SECTION 3 EMERGENCY POWER SUPPLIES FOR CENTRAL
3.1 SCOPE OF SECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 EMERGENCY POWER SOURCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 BATTERIES AND THEIR INSTALLATION . . . . . . . .
3.4 BATTERY CHARGER ASSEMBLY . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5 INVERTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6 ALARM SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SYSTEMS
.........
.........
.........
.........
.........
.........

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SECTION 4 PROVISION OF DISCHARGE TEST FACILITIES
4.1 SCOPE OF SECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.2 REQUIRED FACILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.3 MANUAL TESTING FACILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4.4 AUTOMATIC TESTING FACILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . .

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SECTION 5 INSTALLATION OF EMERGENCY LUMINAIRES AND EXIT SIGNS
5.1 SCOPE OF SECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2 PROVISION OF EMERGENCY LUMINAIRES AND EXIT SIGNS . . . . . .
5.3 INSTALLATIONS EMPLOYING DIRECT LIGHTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4 INSTALLATIONS EMPLOYING INDIRECT LIGHTING . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5 LIGHTING OF STAIRWAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6 INSTALLATION OF EXIT SIGNS (IN AUSTRALIA) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7 INSTALLATION OF EXIT SIGNS (IN NEW ZEALAND) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8 IDENTIFICATION OF EMERGENCY LUMINAIRES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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35
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5

AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

Page
SECTION 6 INSTALLATION OF ELECTRICAL WIRING AND EQUIPMENT
FOR CENTRAL SYSTEMS
6.1 SCOPE OF SECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2 CIRCUIT VOLTAGE DROP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.3 PROTECTION AGAINST OVERCURRENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4 PROTECTION OF THE ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION
AGAINST FIRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5 SEGREGATION OR IDENTIFICATION OF SUBMAINS . . . . . . . . .
6.6 ARRANGEMENT OF FINAL SUBCIRCUITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . 36
. . . . 36
. . . . 36
. . . . 36
. . . . 39
. . . . 39

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SECTION 7 INFORMATION REQUIRED FOR MAINTAINING THE SYSTEM
7.1 SCOPE OF SECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
7.2 OPERATING AND MAINTENANCE MANUAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
7.3 PROVISION FOR THE RECORDING OF MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . 42
APPENDICES
A REFERENCED DOCUMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B TERMINAL BOX FOR THE CONNECTION OF EMERGENCY
LUMINAIRES AND EXIT SIGNS IN CENTRAL SYSTEMS . . .
C DIAGRAMS ILLUSTRATING CERTAIN REQUIREMENTS OR
CHARACTERISTICS OF EMERGENCY LIGHTING SYSTEMS .
D FORMS OF CONSTRUCTION DEEMED TO PROVIDE A
FIRE-RESISTANCE LEVEL OF 15/15/15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . 43
. . . . . . . . 45
. . . . . . . . 51
. . . . . . . . 56

AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

6

FOREWORD
The term ‘emergency lighting’ is commonly used to refer to the following types of
lighting systems, one or more of which may be provided in a building to guard against the
possible loss of the normal lighting:
(a)

Standby lighting Standby lighting systems generally provide relatively high
lighting levels, which will permit normal activities to continue.

(b)

Safety lighting Safety lighting systems are intended to ensure the safety of workers
in proximity to hazardous equipment or processes.

(c)

Evacuation or escape lighting Evacuation or escape lighting systems are intended
to provide visual conditions that will permit the safe evacuation of people from
buildings.

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This Standard is concerned only with emergency evacuation or escape lighting. The
emergency lighting required by this Standard may be provided either by central systems *
or single-point systems *, or by a combination of the two. Both systems have particular
advantages and disadvantages; consequently, no recommendation is made as to which
should be employed.
Attention is drawn to the fact that the reflectance of the main interior surfaces (especially
walls and other vertical surfaces) will significantly influence the visual conditions
provided by an emergency lighting installation. It is therefore recommended that the
colour of these surfaces be as light in tone as practicable.
It is recognized that the presence of smoke will have a detrimental effect on the visual
conditions provided by emergency lighting. The Committee is of the view that there is no
practical way of ensuring that the lighting system will continue to be effective under
smoke conditions, and that dependence must be placed on other measures such as building
construction and ventilation to keep escape paths as free as possible from smoke.
There are developing techniques (e.g. wayfinding systems) that, when applied to escape
routes in addition to conventional emergency evacuation lighting, can enhance the visual
guidance afforded during an emergency involving loss of the normal lighting. These
techniques are not covered in this Standard.
The nature of an emergency lighting system is such that one can never predict when it
may be called upon to function. Consequently, although it is important that the system is
correctly installed and initially operates satisfactorily, it is equally important that regular
inspection and maintenance procedures are instituted to ensure that the system will be in a
state of readiness for operation at all times. The necessary procedures are set out in
AS/NZS 2293.2, Emergency evacuation lighting for buildings , Part 2: Inspection and
maintenance.

* See relevant definitions in Clause 1.3.

7

AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

STANDARDS AUSTRALIA / STANDARDS NEW ZEALAND
Australian / New Zealand Standard
Emergency evacuation lighting for buildings
Part 1: System design, installation and operation

S E C T I O N
1.1

1

S C O P E

A N D

G E N E R A L

SCOPE AND APPLICATION

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1.1.1 Scope This Standard specifies requirements for the equipment used and practices
adopted in the provision of electric emergency evacuation lighting for buildings.
Requirements for emergency luminaires and exit signs are specified by reference to
AS/NZS 2293.3. The objective of the Standard is to provide visual conditions which will
alleviate panic and permit safe evacuation of the building occupants, should this be
necessary, in the event of failure of the electrical supply to the normal lighting.
The Standard does not specify the types of buildings or the particular areas of buildings
which should be provided with emergency evacuation lighting. This will normally be a
matter for determination in accordance with the relevant building regulations. (See the
Building Code of Australia or the New Zealand Building Code, as applicable.)
There are some differences in the requirements specified for application in Australia and
those for application in New Zealand. Such differences are identified at the appropriate
place by a qualification such as ‘In Australia’ or ‘In New Zealand’, as applicable.
NOTES:
1

As it is never known when the emergency evacuation lighting may be called upon, it is
essential that the system be regularly maintained. AS/NZS 2293.2 sets out inspection and
maintenance procedures which are intended to ensure that the installation will continue to
comply with this Standard.

2

In Australia, requirements for the provision of emergency lighting in lift cars are given in
AS 1735. In New Zealand, the comparable requirements are given in Approved
Document D2 of the New Zealand Building Code.

3

AS 3009 specifies requirements for the emergency standby lighting necessary in hospitals
for continued patient care and requires that emergency evacuation lighting be provided in
accordance with the requirements of this Standard and relevant building regulations.

1.1.2 Application This Standard will be referenced in the Building Code of Australia
by way of BCA Amendment 3 to be published by 1 July 1998, thereby superseding the
previous referenced edition, AS 2293.1 — 1987.
This Standard may be called up by the Building Industry Authority in the Fire Safety
sections of the Approved Documents which are expected to be re-published in 1999,
thereby replacing AS/NZS 2293.1:1995 which is currently referenced by the New Zealand
Building Code Handbook, Approved Document F6 as an Acceptable Solution to the
New Zealand Building Code.
1.2 REFERENCED DOCUMENTS
Standard is given in Appendix A.

A list of the documents referred to in this

COPYRIGHT

AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

8

1.3 DEFINITIONS For the purpose of this Standard, the definitions given in the
Building Code of Australia or the New Zealand Building Code, as appropriate, and those
below apply.
NOTE: Definitions of lighting quantities are of the simplified form given in AS 3665, to convey
a basic understanding of the concepts involved. For the more precise primary definitions of
these terms reference should be made to AS 1852.845.

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1.3.1 Ambient temperature—the dry-bulb temperature in still air, averaged over a
period of 8 h.
1.3.2 Approved—approved by the regulatory authority.
1.3.3 Battery—a unit consisting of one or more cells connected in a series, parallel or
series-parallel arrangement to supply the voltage and current requirements of a connected
load.
1.3.4 Boost charge—a system of charging adopted to recover the battery in accordance
with the duty requirements of the system, the voltage of the system under these
circumstances being outside the normal permissible limits of the system.
1.3.5 Cell—the basic single unit consisting of case, electrolyte, positive and negative
plates, and connecting terminals, used for storing electric energy by electrolytic processes.
1.3.6 Central (emergency lighting) system—a system of emergency lighting in which a
number of emergency luminaires and exit signs are supplied from a common power
source.
NOTE: Within a building there may be several power sources each of which supplies the
emergency luminaires and exit signs in a particular section of the building.

1.3.7 Combined emergency luminaire (combined exit sign)—a maintained or
non-maintained emergency luminaire (exit sign) which incorporates an additional lamp
energized from the normal lighting supply.
NOTE: The term ‘sustained emergency luminaire’ (‘sustained exit sign’) is sometimes used to
describe one form of combined emergency luminaire (combined exit sign) in which the
emergency lamps operate in a non-maintained mode (see Clauses 1.3.29 and 1.3.38).

1.3.8 Designated area—a specific area within a building that is required to be provided
with emergency evacuation lighting.
NOTE: These areas should be determined by reference to the Building Code of Australia or the
New Zealand Building Code, as applicable.

1.3.9 Direct lighting—a system of lighting in which most of the light emitted by the
luminaires is directed towards the surfaces to be lit. The term usually refers to light
emitted in a downward direction.
NOTE: A surface is directly lit if there is an unobstructed line from any point on the surface to
the light emitting or reflecting parts of an adjacent emergency luminaire.

1.3.10 Electrolyte density—the density of the electrolyte measure in kilograms per
cubic metre at a specific temperature (the density of pure water = 1000 kg/m 3 at 4°C).
NOTE: The density of an electrolyte was formerly indicated by its specific gravity. Specific
gravity is the ratio of the density of the electrolyte to the density of pure water, i.e.

S.G.

electrolyte density (in kilograms per cubic metre)
1000

1.3.11 Emergency evacuation lighting (emergency lighting)—lighting which is
provided to ensure that the means of escape can be safely and effectively used.
Emergency evacuation lighting systems comprise both emergency luminaires and exit
signs.
NOTES:
1 Throughout this Standard ‘emergency evacuation lighting’ is referred to as ‘emergency
lighting’.
2 The emergency lighting may be derived from central systems, single-point systems
(see Clauses 1.3.6 and 1.3.36), or a combination of both.
COPYRIGHT

9

AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

1.3.12 Emergency luminaire—a luminaire which is designed for use in an emergency
lighting system.
NOTES:
1 Emergency luminaires are required to be classified in accordance with AS/NZS 2293.3. A
bare lamp unit may serve as an emergency luminaire provided that it has been appropriately
classified. An internally illuminated exit sign may also serve as an emergency luminaire
provided that it has been classified for this purpose in accordance with AS/NZS 2293.3.
2 An emergency luminaire may be integral with a normal lighting luminaire or may be a
completely separate unit.

1.3.13 Exit—an exit which is required by building regulations.
1.3.14 Final subcircuit—as defined in AS 3000 or, in New Zealand, The Electricity
Regulations except that, in central systems, wiring originating from the distribution board
to the fused terminal box and wiring between the fused terminal box and the emergency
luminaire or exit sign is deemed to be part of the one final subcircuit.

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NOTE: See Clause 6.4.2.2(b) and Appendix B for details of the fused terminal box and its
installation.

1.3.15 Float charge — the permanent connection of a battery to a voltage-regulated d.c.
system so that the battery is maintained fully charged and able to supply power to the
system if the normal charging source fails.
1.3.16 Illuminance—the luminous flux arriving at a surface divided by the area of the
illuminated surface.
1.3.17 Illumination—a general expression for the quantity of light arriving at a surface.
The physical measure of illumination is illuminance.
1.3.18 Indirect lighting—a system in which most of the light is provided by reflection
from ceilings, walls or other surfaces.
1.3.19 Light loss factor (LLF) — the ratio of the illuminance produced by a lighting
system at a specified time to the illuminance produced by the same system when new.
NOTE: The LLF combines the losses caused by lamp lumen depreciation, luminaire depreciation
and room surface depreciation. See AS 1680.1 or NZS 6703 for further information.

1.3.20 Luminaire—equipment which houses the lamp(s) and directs the light in desired
directions. It includes items necessary for fixing, protecting and operating the lamp(s).
1.3.21 Luminance—the physical quantity corresponding to the brightness of a surface
(e.g. a lamp, luminaire, sky or reflecting material) in a specified direction. It is the
luminous intensity of an area of the surface divided by that area.
Unit: candela per square metre (cd/m 2). Symbol: L.
1.3.22 Luminous flux—the measure of the quantity of light. For a lamp or luminaire it
normally refers to the total light emitted irrespective of the directions in which it is
distributed.
Unit: lumen (lm). Symbol: φ.
1.3.23 Luminous intensity—the concentration of luminous flux emitted in a specified
direction.
Unit: candela (cd). Symbol: I.
1.3.24 Maintained emergency luminaire (maintained exit sign)—an emergency
luminaire (exit sign) in which the emergency lighting lamp(s) are energized at all times
when normal or emergency lighting is required.
NOTE: See Figures C1, C2 and C3 of Appendix C for typical schematic arrangements for a
maintained, self-contained emergency luminaire.

1.3.25 Monitored supply—the electrical supply to normal lighting luminaires, failure of
which is sensed in order to activate the emergency lighting serving the same area.
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AS/NZS 2293.1:1998

10

1.3.26 Mounting height—the vertical distance between the underside of a luminaire and
the floor.
1.3.27 Nominal system voltage—a reference voltage which is used as a basis for the
design of a central emergency lighting system.
NOTE: Preferred values of nominal system voltage are 12 V, 24 V, 32 V, 48 V, 110 V and
240 V.

1.3.28 Non-maintained emergency luminaire (non-maintained exit sign)—an
emergency luminaire (exit sign) in which the emergency lighting lamps are in operation
only when the supply to the normal lighting fails.
NOTE: See Figure C3 of Appendix C for a typical schematic arrangement for a non-maintained,
self-contained emergency luminaire.

1.3.29 Normal lighting—all installed electric lighting operating from the supply in
normal use which, in the absence of adequate daylight, is intended for use during the
whole time that the premises are occupied.
1.3.30 Reflectance (reflection factor)—the ratio of the total luminous flux reflected
from a surface to the total luminous flux which arrives at the surface. Usually expressed
as a decimal in the range 0 to 1, but may also be expressed as a percentage.

Licensed to LUU MINH LUAN on 25 Feb 2002. Single user licence only. Storage, distribution or use on network prohibited.

Symbol: ρ.
1.3.31 Regulatory authority—the body having statutory powers to administer an Act of
Parliament, or the regulations of such an Act, pertaining to any matter covered by this
Standard.
1.3.32 Required in-service duration—the duration of operation of the emergency
lighting system which the regulatory authority requires the system to be capable of
providing at any time.
1.3.33 Reversible inverter—a device which functions as a battery charger while the
normal electricity supply is available and which, on failure of the normal supply, assumes
the function of an inverter supplying the emergency lighting from the emergency power
source.
1.3.34 Room index (K) — an index related to the dimensions of a room used for
calculation of the utilization factor and other characteristics of a lighting installation.
Room index is derived from the following equation:
K

a × b
h(a + b)

. . . 1.1

where
a, b = the dimensions of the sides of the room
h

= the height of the luminaires above the reference plane, e.g. floor.

1.3.35 Self-contained emergency luminaire (self-contained exit sign)—an emergency
luminaire (exit sign) containing or having mounted within 2 m of it, a battery, battery
charger, inverter (where used), and the controls necessary for sensing failure of the
normal supply and for changing over to the emergency supply, and vice versa.
1.3.36 Single-point (emergency lighting) system—a system of emergency lighting
employing self-contained emergency luminaires and exit signs.
1.3.37 Static inverter—a device capable of converting direct current to alternating
current without utilizing moving parts.
1.3.38 Sustained emergency luminaire (sustained exit sign) — an emergency luminaire
(exit sign) which incorporates at least two lamps, one energized from an emergency
supply and operated in a non-maintained mode, the other energized from the normal
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